Monday, May 3, 2010

first citizen journalism conference

first citizen journalism conference


first citizen journalism conference

Posted: 03 May 2010 11:02 AM PDT

since it is the citizen journalism (CJ) conference, i'm writing about it in my CJ blog, reflections. please go there to read, ya.  photos also there.

direct access to the photos i have up on my facebook photo album (about 5 were not taken by me but all the rest were taken by me).



Pakatan Selangor State Government

Posted: 03 May 2010 10:52 AM PDT

On Friday, the Pakatan Selangor State Government had awarded a sand mining permit for the whole state of Selangor to only one company, namely Kumpulan Semesta Sdn Bhd. This is supposedly done to check and eliminate all illegal mining activities carried out by any other companies.

However, I have to say it is wrong. As written in the papers, the sand mining activities in Selangor is worth RM587m a year. That is a huge amount of money. Even if we assume a normal 20% margin, that is easily RM117.4m profit per annum for the company. This is a huge amount for a single company to make annually.


Some of the questions that need to be answered:-

i. Why create a monopoly?

ii. Who decided to give to this one single company?

iii. Who owns the company?

iv. What were the factors for the Selangor State Government decide on only one company?

v. Is this company capable in terms of its track record in the industry, financials, expertise and management capabilities.

vi. What is the issued and paid-up capital of the company? RM2?

vii. Were there any tenders called before deciding on the company?

viii. Where is the transparency advocated so much by the Pakatan party and being highlighted in its election manifesto over and over again?

ix. Where is the accountability?

x. Is this not totally against everything Pakatan has been supposedly fighting for?

This decision by the Pakatan Selangor State Government gives rise to concerns of the possibility of corruption and cronyism.

We must not allow corruption, mismanagement or any wrong doings irregardless BN or Pakatan. I hope the authorities will investigate on this matter.

Ahmad Ikmal Ismail



Beberapa Gambar sekitar beberapa Program di Jerai

Posted: 03 May 2010 10:57 AM PDT



Antara gerakerja sepanjang hujung minggu

Posted: 03 May 2010 09:15 AM PDT



Hujung minggu lepas , saya telah balik ke bahagian. Di antara gerakerja yang telah dijalankan termasuklah melawat dan bermesra dengan peserta-peserta di tapak ekspo, melawat projek ternakan kambing di kg cahaya baru, menziarahi beberapa orang uzur, menziarahi seorang guru yang meninggal dunia. Saya juga telah sempat pergi untuk kenduri kahwin yang telah di adakan.

Di atas adalah beberapa gambar yang telah diambil di tapak ekspo dan kg cahaya baru.


penang finally get a speakers’ square

Posted: 03 May 2010 09:05 AM PDT

whoa!! good news! good news! wonderful news in fact! penang leads! finally the government agreed on a speakers' square for us penangites. this is very good news for activists and all NGOs.

say, we should revive our PAIN – penang anti isa network – and maybe have a anti isa vigil there one day. the last time we had it – ironically at the same place, as expected, the police came to stop us and our MC was arrested. this time we can do it without fear.

the millennium square at the esplanade is a very good strategic location as many people frequent the place since it is by the sea and there are lots of food stalls there. so do come and show your support at the launch. i'm taking leave from work specially to go!

whoa!! thanks to YAB lim guan eng!

Official launch of the Speakers' Square, Penang

by the Chief Minister of Penang, YB Lim Guan Eng

Date:   4th May 2010 ( Tuesday ) 8.00AM
Place:  Speakers' Square
Esplanade, Padang Kota Lama, Penang.
Adjoining the Millennium Square – see picture)


Please bring your friends to celebrate this occasion of attaining a public democratic space!



Noh Omar Hina TGNA Dan Rakyat Kelantan

Posted: 03 May 2010 09:00 AM PDT

Timbalan Pengerusi Umno Selangor Datuk Seri Noh Omar menyifatkan Mursyidul Am PAS, Datuk Nik Abdul Aziz Nik Mat (gambar) sebagai "bodoh" sambil mencabar beliau agar menggunakan masjid-masjid di Kelantan untuk tujuan berpolitik.

"Ada tak panduan yang diberikan oleh kerajaan negeri mengenainya. Kalau ada, tak payahlah ada undang-undang.

"Nak berkempen, nak baca khutbah, tak kisahlah sebab tiada halangan.

"Dia Menteri Besar, buatlah undang-undangnya sendiri dengan sesuka hati," kata beliau selepas merasmikan Perhimpunan Bulanan Kementerian Pertanian dan Industri Asas Tani di Kelab Golf Perkhidmatan Awan hari ini.

Malahan, beliau mendakwa sesiapa yang mempertikaikan isu ini seperti Nik Aziz merupakan perbuatan tidak menghormati Sultan Selangor.

"Jangan nak bawa perangai atau stail orang Kelantan datang ke Selangor.

"Kita ada undang-undang sendiri, ada Sultan sendiri... jadi perbuatan PAS seperti tidak menghormati Sultan," kata beliau sambil menambah, sebagai orang Melayu tidak menghormati Sultan Selangor.

Noh berkata tindakan Nik Aziz adalah tidak menghormati undang-undang negeri lain.

"Dia tolak politik sebagai 'bodoh', dia dua kali ganda lebih bodoh sebab dia Menteri Besar. Andai kata Sultan Kelantan mengeluarkan peraturan sedemikian, adakah dia (Nik Aziz) akan patuh atau tidak?

"Kalau tak suka, pergi ke negeri yang rasa masjid boleh jadi tempat politik, dipersilakan. Usah datang ke Selangor. Jangan nak hina undang-undang orang Selangor," kata beliau.

Khamis lalu, Sultan Selangor Sultan Sharafuddin menjelaskan baginda melarang masjid digunakan sebagai pentas politik demi menjaga kesucian dan kehormanian tempat beribadat.

Nik Aziz dilaporkan berkata beliau menganggapnya sebagai karut dan peninggalan penjajah.

Noh yang juga Timbalan Pengerusi Barisan Nasional (BN) berkata, sekiranya Nik Aziz yang juga Menteri Besar Kelantan hendak datang nak berceramah dalam masjid, datanglah berceramah.

"Orang Islam di Selangor faham agama. Kalau Nik Aziz tidak datang ceramah di Selangor, pegangan Islam orang Selangor tak kurang hebat juga darinya.

"Kita juga ada ulama-ulama kita sendiri.

"Janganlah ingat Nik Aziz saja yang beragama hebat sebab janggutnya lebih panjang dari ulama Selangor.

"Kalau nak politik, politiklah, jangan nak menghina undang-undang orang," katanya. -TMI


ONLY UMNO AND BN FEED ON RACISM AND CRONYISM TO SURVIVE

Posted: 03 May 2010 08:33 AM PDT

The Penang government responds to allegations, citing measures taken to help the state's Malay community.
 
Penang Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng reeled off a list of measures that have been implemented to raise the living standards of the Malay community in the state, fending off allegations by assemblypersons from Umno who accused the state government of being 'anti-Malay'.

Among the items in Lim's checklist was the doubling of the allocation for Islamic affairs from RM12.5 million in 2008 to RM24.3 million this year, and implementation of the open tender system that
enabled 67 percent of the Malay contractors to obtain contracts from the Water Department and 70 percent from the state-owned Penang Development Corporation.
 
"This shows the Malays can compete on their own without being dependent on anyone," said Lim, during the Question session at the state assembly sitting today and quipped, "Only Umno and BN contractors need projects from cronies to survive."


Time's most influential artist: Lady Gaga - Lady Gaga is a Satanic singer??

Posted: 03 May 2010 08:03 AM PDT

NEW YORK, April 30 — Extravagantly outfitted singer Lady Gaga, former US president Bill Clinton and Brazil's leader Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva are the world's most influential people according to Time magazine's annual list.
The US weekly explains its sometimes surprising choices saying that the "Time 100 is not about the influence of power but the power of influence."
Lady Gaga, famous for bizarre costumes and chart-topping dance music, leads the list of most influential artists, leading US late-night TV host Conan O'Brien, Oscar winning director Kathryn Bigelow and daytime TV queen Oprah Winfrey.
Clinton, who has reinvented himself as a major fund-raiser and anti-poverty activist since leaving the White House, heads the "heroes" section, beating South Korean figure skater Kim Yu-Na and Iranian opposition leader Mir-Hossein Mousavi.
The "leaders" list starts with the Brazilian president, who is praised for his drive to bring social justice and end deep inequality in his huge Latin American country.
JT Wang, CEO of the Taiwanese PC maker Acer comes in at number two as a representative of the rise of Asian companies.
The top US military officer, Admiral Mike Mullen, is third, with President Barack Obama only in the fourth slot.
"Some of the people you'll encounter on this list are influential in the traditional sense," Time managing editor Richard Stengel says. "But we also seek out people whose ideas and actions are revolutionising their fields and transforming lives." — AFP/Relaxnews

Interestingly and incidentally, I read a fellow blogger's posting - 'Proof That Lady Gaga Is A Satanic Singer'. Here's my comment in his posting:
If she is one, she is certainly not the first. There are or were many before her, I'm sure.
If she's one, she's certainly satan's HOTTEST property, right now!


SOME TIPS FOR THE CHIEF OF ARMY DESIGNATE

Posted: 03 May 2010 07:31 AM PDT

Since the new army leadership has been announced, I have been receiving several SMSs and calls affirming their satisfaction to the choice of both the designated COA and DCOA i.e. Lt Jen Zulkifli Zain popularly known as ZZ (to be promoted to full General upon assuming his new appointment), and Lt Jen Zulkifli Zainal Abidin (ZZA) respectively. I am glad that the norm with regards to appointing the DCOA to take over as COA in the new army lineup is being respected. I am now told that the incumbent COA will relinquish his post on May 20, and thereafter proceed on leave.

There will surely be many things already in the mind of the COA designate, of what he aspires his command would be. I believe that one of the most important thing he should do upon assuming his new post is to ensure the right selection of his immediate staffs that will serve him well, loyal, honest, truthful and most importantly, that they all possess the highest level of personal integrity. There are many among the current crop of officers that possesses such traits and qualities, and if ZZ is able to identify them and bring them to his side, then I am quite sure we are going to see a rehabilitated and rejuvenated army, for the army certainly deserves something better now, than the past.

I am quite sure too that ZZ does not want to inherit the 'legacies' (good or bad) of his predecessor, and in this regards he will need to dispose of those officers whom he think will be a bane to him because of the link that they are likely to have with his predecessor. The link can take many forms, and the most important being the business dealings that they have had in the past with some favoured companies and agents. I say this because of what I hear from within and outside the confines of army. ZZ has to be serious about this if he wants to be recognized as a professional soldier and a true leader of men, and is devoid of any personal interest and linkages with businessman, defence contractors and its agents.

Assuming the exulted post of COA comes with a myriad of responsibilities. More importantly, such responsibilities extend to not only the soldiers but to their families as well. This is actually the crux of soldiering, and as the saying goes, 'if there are no soldiers, then there are no officers'. This saying is merely to emphasize the importance of soldiers in the army, and if an officer fails in his/her responsibility towards his charge, he/she is deemed to have failed in his/her responsibility. ZZ's responsibility now is to ensure that all officers under his command know full well their responsibilities towards their charges and their families first, before self.

I am quite sure that ZZ throughout his army service has had many experiences serving under several superior officers, and is well acquainted with the idiosyncrasies of his superiors. He would have also learnt and observe their style of command of his superiors; one that he admires, and one that he opposes. It is quite normal among subordinates to observe their superiors, to learn and to emulate the good leadership traits that are inherent in the superiors. This is what most retirees like me, and many others in the service today hope to see of ZZ; an exemplary leader who show good leadership qualities, and one that does not throw tantrums like a mad bull.

The army has seen such acts in the past, and I can say for certain that such acts are only done by those who have a serious a personality problem, and is lacking in self confidence. The reason he throws his tantrums is to show others that he is in control over all things and to exert his authority, merely to hide his apparent self weaknesses. People of this sort are weaklings, unmotivated and have false pride in them.

What I have said above are nothing new and equally, it is not my desire to teach ZZ what leadership entails. I believe he knows more than I do. But my concern is the army for which I still adore, and an early reminder to ZZ about some of the things that he should observe is apt, before he assumes the exulted post of COA.

I think, he knows too the reasons why I have been critical of army in the past, and if he don't, what he need to do is read all my previous postings to understand my criticism of the army, especially with regards to corruption (or seen to be corrupt) by a certain group of army officers, which he may or may not know. And if nothing changes and corruption still prevails, let it be known that I will continue to criticize the army leadership till my dying days.

CRUSADE AGAINST CORRUPTION


Burma’s Royal June Rose

Posted: 03 May 2010 07:19 AM PDT

Source : Between two worlds

From Griffith REVIEW Edition 27: Food Chain, Written by Hamish McDonald

Download the complete article PDF

June Rose Bellamy, also known as Yadana Nat Mai

IN MANDALAY BURMA of the nineteenth century, the scholarly and pious Mindon was made king in 1853 with the help of his warrior brother Kanaung Min, to start last-minute reforms to stave off the encroaching European powers, as the legendary King Mongkut was doing in neighbouring Siam. But in 1866 Kanaung Min was killed in a bloody takeover attempt by Mindon's own sons. The Prince of Limbin, a son of Kanaung Min, was smuggled to safety.

By 1885, as British steamboats packed with soldiers came up the Irrawaddy to storm the vast Mandalay fort-palace, depose the last king and exile him to India, the Limbin prince had grown up and become the figurehead of a rebellious confederacy of Shan princes, who turned from fighting the Burmese to opposing the British. In 1887, the prince was forced to surrender when the Shans did a deal with the British, and he too was exiled.

One of his daughters, Princess Ma Lat – June Rose Bellamy's mother – was born in Calcutta in 1894, and later attended high school in Allahabad, mixing in high society. She met the German crown prince, the future Kaiser Wilhelm, who thought her the most striking woman he encountered on his Asian tour. She was betrothed to the young ruler of Sikkim, but he was poisoned eight days before their wedding. Further attempts to arrange a marriage were abandoned. Small and exquisite, with a will of steel, the princess was a free spirit whom nobody liked to counter.

It is chilly in Florence when we get off the fast train up from Rome. The calories from the rushed breakfast, the café latte in the dining car as the sere landscape whizzed by, are fast wearing off as our taxi crosses the river and winds through the narrow lanes of the old San Frediano district of artisan workshops.

In Via Camaldoli, we find a plain two-storey shopfront that bears the nameplate Associazione Culturale Arte e Gastronomia Orientale. Since 1983, the association has provided cooking classes in English and Italian, teaching locals the finer points of Italian and Asian cooking.

The door is opened by a woman of nearly seventy-seven with the fine features of a great beauty, the hair now grey, recognisable from the photographs of a bygone era in a far-off land of sweeping rivers, layers of blue mountains and paddy fields. She is wearing an ankle-length tight woollen skirt in a tartan pattern, with a blue cashmere top.

'It's tartan in your honour,' June Rose Bellamy, also known as Yadana Nat Mai, says with a huge smile. 'I like to dress in Burmese style but you've got
to face it, it's cold here!' It's obviously warm, but also quite oriental in effect, a winter version of the figure-hugging sarong and blouse of South-East Asia.

We walk in, past drawings of horses – the passion of her father, an Australian bookmaker – and Asian artefacts; past framed formal portraits in black-and-white and sepia of Asian people in lavish formal dress, and new colour photos of a village aid project in Burma; and past a big table set for lunch, with an enticing orange flan heavy with a luscious-looking sauce waiting on a floral dish in the middle.

We sit in a sofa and armchair under the portraits. But Bellamy is constantly breaking off to disappear into the kitchen. Eventually we follow, into a large space of grey marble chopping surfaces, hanging pots and pans, and a huge stainless-steel cooking range, and settle around the kitchen table.

'Have you tasted really good Tuscan new oil?' Bellamy asks. 'This one comes from the house of a friend of mine, and I would say it's this year's very best.' Slices of bread are brought toasted on a metal grid over a gas burner – 'You never get a toaster that gives you a taste of the flame' – and we dip into a dish of very light green oil.

It tastes light, a little grassy. 'It comes from higher up in the hills, and it's made by a fanatic. He even removes the stone from the olive: it is made from just the pulp, and his home growth is of only one type of olive. To be doing it properly you should be tasting without the bread, just off a spoon, but I won't put you through that. When I tasted it, I almost lost a friend, because I said that it wasn't olive-y. It's very good, but I think it's got something to do with removing the stone. Maybe that was in my head. It's very light.'

IN MANDALAY BURMA of the nineteenth century, the scholarly and pious Mindon was made king in 1853 with the help of his warrior brother Kanaung Min, to start last-minute reforms to stave off the encroaching European powers, as the legendary King Mongkut was doing in neighbouring Siam. But in 1866 Kanaung Min was killed in a bloody takeover attempt by Mindon's own sons. The Prince of Limbin, a son of Kanaung Min, was smuggled to safety.

By 1885, as British steamboats packed with soldiers came up the Irrawaddy to storm the vast Mandalay fort-palace, depose the last king and exile him to India, the Limbin prince had grown up and become the figurehead of a rebellious confederacy of Shan princes, who turned from fighting the Burmese to opposing the British. In 1887, the prince was forced to surrender when the Shans did a deal with the British, and he too was exiled.

One of his daughters, Princess Ma Lat – June Rose Bellamy's mother – was born in Calcutta in 1894, and later attended high school in Allahabad, mixing in high society. She met the German crown prince, the future Kaiser Wilhelm, who thought her the most striking woman he encountered on his Asian tour. She was betrothed to the young ruler of Sikkim, but he was poisoned eight days before their wedding. Further attempts to arrange a marriage were abandoned. Small and exquisite, with a will of steel, the princess was a free spirit whom nobody liked to counter.

A NEW OIL is produced. 'This I find a typically good oil: it comes from this area, a little high; it has more body,' Bellamy says. 'The previous one was super-delicate; you tend to get lost. You couldn't possibly cook with it. Even if you used it in a salad or something like that, it would get lost in the food. To me, this is Tuscany. It's not for sale; they only make enough for the house, and they give a bottle to friends; it's very smooth, a nice artichoke taste.' It is indeed very flavoursome, without the sharpness that catches the back of the throat with most olive oils.

As British guns crushed Burmese independence, Herbert Bellamy, born in 1878 to English migrants, was growing up in Victoria. He ranged across the goldfields as far as Kalgoorlie, making and losing money, augmenting his funds from wins in professional sprint races and organising boxing bouts. He tried running sheep but couldn't stand the smell of them, and concentrated instead on his racehorses. After excursions to London and France, Bellamy became a fixture on an Asian circuit between Bombay, Calcutta and Batavia (Jakarta), as both breeder and bookmaker.

One day he was chatting with the Sultan of Johore in Malaya, a friend with a common interest in dog fighting. 'Y'know, Bellamy, you should go to Burma,' said the sultan. 'It's an interesting country. Maybe you could do something about horses there.' Bellamy went, fell in love with the country and settled at the Rangoon racecourse.

After World War I, the Limbin prince was allowed to return to Burma and his extensive family settled in Rangoon. They were anachronisms in a booming new state of mines, rice exports, railways and the famous steamboats of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company. Ma Lat attended the races and went to place a bet, where she met the expat Australian: the attraction was instant.

Maurice Collis, a colonial judge and author, wrote in his 1938 book Trials in Burma of receiving a call from Ma Lat in 1928. 'She sat on the sofa, a beautiful woman, in a blue silk skirt and a jacket of white lawn, her complexion corn-coloured, her eyes large and brilliant, and with exquisite hands.' She asked him to wed her and Bellamy.

The marriage took place on 18 October at 4.48 pm, a time fixed as auspicious by an astrologer. 'She was dressed reminiscent of the court of Mandalay in a royal hta-mein of oyster-coloured silk set with silver diamante; her hair, in the loose tail style, was charged with orchids and there were pearls winding at her throat and breast. She came forward slowly, waving a white fan, with a look of dignity and emotion on her face. Mr Bellamy followed in a morning coat. The ceremony of civil marriage is exceedingly bald, for it consists of hardly more than the taking of oaths. When some documents are signed it is all over. On this occasion its abruptness seemed almost rude. I declared them married and took Ma Lat's hand. The occasion seemed to be strange and disturbing. Had the rape of Mandalay ended in this?'

BELLAMY BRINGS ANOTHER dish of dark brown paste, made by her pupils. 'Now this is 110 per cent Florentine, Tuscan,' she says. 'It's made from chicken livers. Traditionally it should be made from the spleen, but you try to get an American tourist to stand there and get blood out of the spleen. So we do it with the liver. This is country food, what you serve before the meal. There is not a single part of the animal which is not used.' She brings out a bottle of Il Principe pinot nero, from a vineyard named after Machiavelli.

June Rose was born in 1932, and given the name Yadana Nat Mai (Goddess of the Nine Jewels) as well as her English one. She began an idyllic childhood between the two cultures of her parents. 'Mummy was still very much within the laws of what was her due, what was her right, as royalty,' she said. 'At home we spoke Burmese – not the Burmese that ordinary Burmese speak, but court Burmese. I grew up speaking that, and English, and Hindi. I lived on one side very Buddhist. We never wore our shoes upstairs. The food for the monks was prepared first thing every morning. When it came the time for the festivals, my father would disappear hunting. From his side, we had Christmas trees, we had Easter bunnies; I rode, and I shot. What Buddhist shoots?'

June Rose was very close to her father, who set up bamboo hurdles for her in the yard, told her yarns about his time in the Australian bush and read her Henry Lawson's poems. 'I can tell you everything about Kalgoorlie, the Southern Cross; I can tell you about the half-bald cockatoo in the pub in whose cup people would pour beer, and when the parrot was sloshed he'd say: "Give me another feather and I'll fly."'

In February 1942, when June Rose was nine, the idyll ended. Japanese bombers raided Rangoon as the prelude to occupation, narrowly missing the Bellamy house, and the family were evacuated to India. They settled in Allahabad, the sleepy North Indian city at the junction of the Ganges and Yamuna rivers, where the religious gathering of the Kumbh Mela, the largest human assembly in the world, occurs every twelve years.

The city was also home to the Nehru family. An aunt, one of the Limbin prince's other daughters, had married an Indian maharajah allied with Jawaharlal Nehru's independence struggle and who was with him in the Allahabad jail. June Rose went along when her aunt visited. 'My uncle was in one cell, and there was water on the floor with the fan blowing on the water to keep cool. Four doors down was Nehru,' she recalls. 'When I saw the film Gandhi I had to see it again. The first time I cried all the way through.'

June Rose was sent to a convent school in Kalimpong at eleven, where Herbert Bellamy's influence was her downfall. A nun who clearly looked down on mixed-race children was giving a geography lesson about Australia, and sarcastically asked June Rose if she'd left anything off the map on the blackboard. June Rose put a dot in the centre. 'Baragarawindy,' she told the class, 'is dream country; it is the land of opposites, the rivers flow inland instead of out, the leaves grow upwards instead of down, the snakes have feathers and the crows fly backwards to keep the dust out of their eyes.' She was expelled.

At fourteen, she returned with her parents to a wrecked and bombed Rangoon. Her father went into semi-retirement in the British-built hill station of Maymyo, outside Mandalay, where teak and brick houses in a vaguely Tudor style sit amid lawns and beds of roses and sweet peas. Bellamy ran a few horses, disappeared to his hunting lodge in the forests and collected rare orchids. The shrinking British community looked down on him as a bookie and colonial; they and the Burmese sniffed at mixed-race families; but both communities had to open their doors because of Ma Lat's royal lineage. 'On one hand that put me in a privileged position but at the same time it raised my gall, because I was no better than any other Anglo-Burman,' June Rose explains.

She was growing into a noted beauty. The English travel writer Norman Lewis met the Bellamy family at a party in Maymyo, and in his 1955 book, Golden Earth, called Herbert Bellamy 'a man of genial and confidential manner' and Ma Lat a 'still handsome' woman with an expression of inner amusement. June Rose 'allied to the graceful beauty of the Burmese a quite European vivacity'. And practicality: 'When the family were about to leave, in an elderly and ailing British car, June Rose showed much skill in locating a short in the wiring, and much tomboyish energy in winding the starting handle until the engine fired.'

Winning an essay competition, June Rose was given a three-month tour of the United States as a prize, and flourished on what passed for the social circuit in the fragile yet hopeful fifteen years after Burma's independence, in 1946, when democracy faltered amid repeated insurgencies. She was a contender for a role in the war movie The Purple Plain, as the young Burmese nurse who gives a suicidal pilot (played by Gregory Peck) an interest in life, but says she pulled out during the shooting in Ceylon. 'It was so Hollywood, it was ridiculous; it was an insult to anything that had to do with Burma,' she said. 'When the film did come to Burma there was a big hue and cry. Things in the pagoda, things a Buddhist would never do.'

In 1954 she married Mario Postiglione, a young Italian doctor working on malaria prevention with the World Health Organization. Seven months after the birth of the first of their two sons, Mario was kidnapped by Burmese communists. 'They were all well-educated – former students,' June Rose said. '"We have nothing against you or him," they said, "and how is your royal mother and your son?" It happened during the visit of [the Soviet leaders] Khruschev and Bulganin to Burma. "We want the world to know the government has no control of the country. We need the money to buy the arms. Too bad it's your husband." After we got him back, the UN told us to get out of Burma.'

June Rose went with Mario to WHO postings in Damascus, Geneva and Manila. From the Philippines, she was able to fly back to Rangoon to be with her father when he died, in 1963.

NOW COMES THE main course. June Rose moves to the oven and pulls out a large covered dish. Inside is a roll of meat, surrounded by small potatoes roasted a dark golden-brown in a coating of oil and pan juices. 'Rabbit – isn't he gorgeous?' she says. 'This is very typical of Tuscany. This is another one of those dishes that make country food interesting, because a little has to go a long way. It's actually a very small rabbit, but he's been pounded flat to make him double his size, and inside you have pancake, the liver minced up and fried with onions. So from three eggs and one rabbit you can feed eight to ten people.' From a bench top, she produces the greens, a circular flan of shredded zucchini. We set to, with topped-up glasses of Il Principe.

IN ITALY, JUNE Rose and Mario divorced, and she was raising their two boys, Michael and Maurice, when she learned that Ma Lat was gravely ill after a stroke. By then, Burma had become isolated after the army chief, General Ne Win, seized power in 1962 and stepped up the ongoing wars against the many domestic insurgents.

'I couldn't get a visa, so I sent Ne Win a telegram – I'd known him for years; I was a very good friend of his wife, Katie; we'd always sort of kept in touch,' she said. 'So I cabled him: "Mummy critical. Rome embassy incapable of giving me a visa. Please help." The embassy called and said I didn't even have to go to them: they'd meet me at the airport. But in the meantime I got a cable saying mother had died. So I didn't go back. I wrote and thanked him. I would have done anything to see my mother, but to go and collect her ashes…

'A year later he came to Europe. And we met. I thanked him for
what he'd done. I discovered that Katie had died. And that was how our connection started. He asked what I was doing here. I mentioned my children, my divorce. He said I should go back to Burma. To do what? This thing went backwards and forwards, and on another trip he proposed. I hadn't been back to Burma; all this happened here.' She went to Rangoon in 1978, and they were married. 'It was not one of those lavish things.'

June Rose is distracted, edgy as she talks. She looks for the small bottle of beer she has been drinking instead of wine. She gets up and clears the plates, clattering noisily in the sink.

IN THE LATE 1970s, Ne Win and his military regime were losing international respectability. Earlier, the anti-communist general had been useful to the West, and his isolationist economic policies and authoritarianism not so unusual. Gough Whitlam had even brought him to Canberra on an official visit in 1974.

Now the dance with Deng Xiaoping's China had begun. The rest of South-East Asia was starting to pull ahead. Ne Win's superstition and his fascination with lessons from Burma's, blood-soaked history were becoming obsessive.

But he was still an attractive man, recalls Pamela Gutman, a Sydney scholar of Burma who finished her doctorate on the cultural history of Burma's Arakan state about that time. She presented her visa and an introductory letter at Ne Win's gate, after being studied by a periscope that appeared over the wall and swivelled in her direction. A dinner followed, with Ne Win serving game he'd just shot up in Shan state, along with a bottle of sweet German wine – a taste he'd evidently developed on his annual trips to spas and physicians in Germany and Austria. The conversation was desultory, with the leader consulting a colonel often about what he should say. Bizarrely, it ended with Ne Win suggesting an Australia-Burma cultural agreement. The Australian ambassador was excited. 'What sort of scotch does he drink? I'll send a case in.'

Ne Win thought marriage to June Rose would be advantageous. 'All the locals would say it was a good thing because she had royal blood, and legitimised his regime,' Gutman said. June Rose agrees. 'I think – and people say it, which is why I can say it – I was a sort of lollipop for the people,' she says. 'Whatever average people say about me or my Anglo half, the family name is still very important in Burma, the royalty, the Limbin.'

In her mind, June Rose says, was the idea of doing some good for the country. But she admits failure, though she won't talk about any of the conversations or issues she had with Ne Win. She suggests that he was barely in control of his regime by that point.

'Had I been able to do anything, had it served a purpose, had something been able to be done – but I realise I saw too many things,' she says. 'He was being taken for a ride by his people. We're not talking about manipulation, but being put in a position where you don't know everything. You think you know everything, but a dictatorship in a country like Burma, as long as it is, with all the different tribes – each command is a watertight compartment.'

Ne Win never felt he was out of the loop. 'Oh, they weren't that stupid. Neither was the media, which needed a scapegoat. He was always the éminence gris. He was always the one who was manipulating everybody. It was too convenient,' she said.

'But all you have to think is that when he died [in 2002, after being sidelined by his army peers in the wake of the 1988 uprising], he died alone, abandoned, ignored. And something that would be impossible for a normal Buddhist or a Burmese to conceive: he was buried the same day without a friendly soul by the graveside. After all that time? What were they hiding? Why did they have to get him out of the way as fast as possible? To cover up things. They did what the British did – do you know my grandfather's grave didn't have a name on it? He was to be forgotten.'

The marriage ended after just five months. June Rose won't go into the cause of the final rupture. Gutman says the rumour is that Ne Win was entertaining one of his wartime Japanese mentors, who was by then working for a trading company, when June Rose mentioned the worsening state of Burma's economy. June Rose laughs at another popular rumour, that Ne Win suspected she was a western spy.

She does confirm that it ended when Ne Win threw an ashtray at her. 'It was one of those things that happened. Rage. Anger. I know why, but on the other hand I don't. It's something that is too questionable. The fact remains that yes, there was a physical attack, but even that is not simple,' she says. 'Okay, so he did fling the bloody ashtray. I can't deny it, because there were servants and obviously it is the servants who are talking today…There was an ashtray, but it didn't hit me between the eyes and I'm still alive. But it's not the ashtray. It is the last drop in the glass, the last straw.'

June Rose left the next day, seen off by Ne Win's daughter, Sanda (now jailed for corruption by Ne Win's successors), and a guard of honour as she flew out in what was then Burma's only passenger plane certified for international routes. Word of the marriage breakdown had not spread. Ne Win had gone up country. She felt lucky to get out.

'I LEFT BURMA with a definite feeling of failure,' June Rose says now. 'Because I had failed my people. Because they did put their trust in me when I arrived. And this was one of the things that was not liked. But I would rather I left as a failure than to be connected with the ruling people. Those who had trusted in me, those who believed in me can say she left, but she left rather than not be able to do anything. In Italian, they say un peccato di orgoglio; in English, a sin of pride. Because I thought I could do something which others had not done. And that's a very bad sin.'

June Rose has written an engaging essay about her family and upbringing, but says she won't write about her time with the dictator. 'To say something, to write a book, one would have to have a very good knowledge of Burmese history, culture, and a super-excellent knowledge of the construction of a military dictatorship,' she said. 'You can't put all that in a book. You'd bore people to death.'

Gutman says that there was talk among diplomats of the time that June Rose had indeed written, or was about to write, a book titled 'One Hundred Days with Ne Win' but was persuaded not to publish by a sizable settlement with Rangoon. In Florence there is comfort, but no sign of wealth. Her shopfront school of Burmese and Italian cooking, with her apartment upstairs, provides a modest living and is gaining a reputation on the self-education tourism circuit. Her charitable work, through Rangoon-based doctors, is putting young Burmese students through medical school and helping a village hit by last year's Cyclone Nargis.

Her younger son, Maurice, died in a motor accident some years ago; but his son, Alex, twenty-five, is now close to her, as is her older son, Michael. Two years ago, she and Alex went to Burma and found the grave of her grandfather, the Limbin prince, in a monastery. At 5 am, when the earth's energy is said to be at its peak, they paid homage by serving the morning meal to the ten abbots and 120 monks. Alex, who had never been to Burma and until then seemed completely Italian, said he felt at home. 'I didn't feel I was visiting,' he told her. 'Everything we do at your home in Florence, people are doing all around us here.'

June Rose says she still tries to lead a Buddhist life. 'But the other day we went to a fun fair, and I was still able to topple off, without my glasses, a barrel at the shooting range.'

We eat the orange flan. It is soft and creamy, with a heavy flavour like curaçao liqueur.

Suddenly we realise it is mid-afternoon. We leave the half-world of Burma, pioneering Australia and Cold War diplomacy that the lunch has conjured up, and step into the subdued light of wintry Tuscany. June Rose farewells us, beaming as she did on our arrival.  

မၾကာေသးခင္ က.. ထြက္တဲ့.. ၾသစေၾတလ် အေရွ႕ပိုုင္း Griffith University ရဲ႕ Review journal အမွတ္စဥ္ 27 မွာ ေရးထားတဲ့ Between Two Worlds ဆိုုတဲ့.. စာေလး တပုုဒ္ကိုု.. ဆရာမ ေဒၚၾကည္ေမေကာင္း ဘေလာ့မွာ ေပးတဲ့ လင့္ေတြ က တဆင့္ ဖတ္လိုုက္ မိတယ္။ အဲဒီ ဂ်ာနယ္ေလးက.. တခါထုုတ္ရင္.. ေခါင္းစဥ္ Theme တခုု ေအာက္မွာ ၀ိုုင္းေရး ၾက တာ မ်ိဳးေလး ပါ ။ အဲဒီ အမွတ္စဥ္ ၂၇ က လည္း.. food အစားအစာ အေၾကာင္း ပါ..။ ေတာ္ယံုု ဆိုုလည္း..အဲဒီ ေခါင္းစဥ္ ေအာက္မွာ..ကိုုယ္တိုု႕ လိုု လူေတြ အတြက္.. ဒီေလာက္ စိတ္၀င္စားစရာ ေကာင္းမဲ့..စာမ်ိဳး ပါလာမယ္ လိုု႕ … ထင္စရာ အေၾကာင္း သိပ္မရွိ ဘူး ေလ။ ေတြ႕ မဲ့ ေတြ႕လိုုက္ေတာ့.. ဗမာလူမ်ိဳး ေတြ..အေတာ္ စိတ္၀င္စား တဲ့.. အမ်ိဳးသမီး တေယာက္ အေၾကာင္း ျဖစ္ေန တယ္…။
မင္းေဆြ မင္းမ်ိဳး ကုုန္းေဘာင္ ဆက္ လည္း ျဖစ္.. ပံုုျပင္ ဆန္ဆန္..သ ွ်ိုု႕၀ွက္ သည္းဖိုု ဆန္ဆန္ …နားစြန္ နားဖ်ား ၾကားခဲ့ ရ ဘူးတဲ့.. အာဏာရွင္ေဟာင္း ဦးေန၀င္း ၾကီး ရဲ႕.. ဇနီးေဟာင္း တေယာက္ လည္း ျဖစ္ခဲ့ ဖူးတဲ့.. ရတနာနတ္မယ္ ရဲ႕ တပိုုင္း တစ ပံုုရိပ္ တခ်ိဳ႕ ကိုု.. သူမ ရဲ႕.. အီတာလ်ံ တက္စကန္နီ ေတာစာ ပံုုစံ ေကၽြးေမြး တည္ခင္း တဲ့….ေန႕လည္စာ ၀ိုုင္း ေလး တခုုမွာ .. ေနာက္ခံ ထား ျပီး..ေရး ထား တာ ပါ။
ရတနာနတ္မယ္
photo source: wikimyanmar
အဲဒီ စာေလး ကိုု… စိတ္၀င္ တစား ဖတ္ရင္း.. တခ်ိဳ႕ အခ်က္ေလး ေတြကိုု.. ေရြးျပီး..ေ၀မ ွ်ခ်င္ စိတ္ ျဖစ္လာ မိတယ္။ ေ၀မ ွ် ခ်င္တယ္ ဆိုုတာ လည္း..ဘာ အက်ိဳးျပဳ.. ဘာ၀ါဒ ျဖန္႕ မွ မဟုုတ္ဘူး ဆိုုတာ ရွင္းပါတယ္။ လူ႕သဘာ၀.. ဒီလိုု အေၾကာင္းေလး ေတြကိုု.. သိခ်င္ စိတ္၀င္စားတာ.. မဆန္းလိုု႕ မိုု႕.. ဗမာျပည္က.. စာအုုပ္ေတြမွာ… ေမာင္သန္းေဆြ ( ထား၀ယ္ ) ေရးတဲ့.. မင္းေဆြ မင္းမ်ိဳး ေတြ.. အေၾကာင္း.. စိတ္၀င္တစား လိုုက္ဖတ္ ရ သလိုု မ်ိဳး ပဲ ဆိုုပါေတာ့ ေလ…။
ဒီ ေဆာင္းပါး အရ ေတာ့.. ေဆာင္းပါး ရွင္ ကိုုယ္တိုုင္ က.. ေရာမ က ေန တဆင့္.. အီတလီ ရဲ႕ နာမည္ ေက်ာ္ .. Tuscany ျပည္ နယ္ ျမိဳ႕ေတာ္ ျဖစ္တဲ့… Florence မွာ ေနထိုုင္ တဲ့ .. Ms June Rose Bellamy ေခၚ.. ရတနာ နတ္မယ္ ရဲ႕ Associazione Culturale Arte e Gastronomia Orientale လိုု႕ ဆိုုင္းဘုုတ္ ခ်ိတ္ ဆြဲ ထားတဲ့.. အိမ္ေလးကုုိ အလည္အပတ္ ေရာက္သြားပံုု နဲ႕ စ ထားပါတယ္။ သူ႕ ေဆာင္းပါး ေလးက.. အီတာလ်ံ အစားအေသာက္ အေၾကာင္း ေလးေတြ.. သူမ ခ်က္ပံုု ျပဳတ္ပံုု ေလး ေတြ တပိုုဒ္… သူမ ရဲ႕ ေနာက္ခံ ဇတ္ေၾကာင္း ေလး ေတြ တပိုုဒ္ နဲ႕.. တကယ့္.. ျပဇတ္ ဆန္ ဆန္ ေလး ေရး ထားတာပါ…။ အဲဒီ အထဲ မွာ မွ.. သူမ ကိုုယ္တိုုင္ ဖြင့္ဟ ေျပာျပ တဲ့..တခ်ိဳ႕ စကားေလး ေတြ ဟာ..ေတာ္ေတာ္ စိတ္၀င္စား စရာ ေကာင္းပါတယ္။

တကယ္ေတာ့.. ဗမာ့ သမိုုင္း မွာ ေခတ္မီသူ..ျပဳျပင္ေျပာင္းလဲ လိုုသူ လိုု႕ လူသိမ်ား ထင္ရွား တဲ့… ကေနာင္မင္းသား ၾကီး ရဲ႕ ျမစ္ေတာ္ တေယာက္ အေန နဲ႕… တင္.. သူမ ဘ၀ က..စိတ္၀င္စားစရာ ေကာင္းေနခဲ့ ပါျပီ။ အင္ဂလိုု ကျပား ျဖစ္တာ.. ေခ်ာတာ လွတာ..ေခတ္ဆန္တာ.. ေနာက္ဆံုုး.. ဗမာျပည္က.. နာမယ္ေက်ာ္ အာဏာရွင္ ၾကီး နဲ႕ လက္ထပ္ လိုုက္တာ ဆိုုတဲ့ အခ်က္ ေတြ ကေတာ့.. ထပ္ဆင့္ ပိုုကဲ ျပီး.. ေျပာမဆံုုးေပါင္.. ေတာသံုုးေထာင္ ျဖစ္ သြား ရေတာ့ တာပါပဲ။

- သူတိုု႕ မိသားစုု ရဲ႕.. အရြယ္ အပိုုင္း အျခား ပံုုရိပ္ေတြ ကိုု.. တြက္ခ်က္ ခန္႕မွန္းၾကည့္ ေတာ့… သူမ ရဲ႕ မိခင္.. လင္းပင္ မင္းသားၾကီး ရဲ႕ သမီးေတာ္..ထိပ္တင္ မလတ္ က.. အသက္ ၃၄ ႏွစ္မွာ..သူမ ထက္ ၁၆ ႏွစ္ ၾကီး တဲ့.. ၾသစေၾကလ် နိုုင္ငံသား..အဂၤလိပ္လူမ်ိဳး ဘြက္ကီ ျမင္းပြဲဒိုုင္ Mr Herbert Bellamy နဲ႕ လက္ထပ္ တယ္။ ေလးႏွစ္ ၾကာမွ ..သူမ ကိုု ေမြးတယ္။ သူမ ကိုုယ္တိုုင္ ကေတာ့.. အသက္ ၂၂ ႏွစ္မွာ.ပထမ အိမ္ေထာင္ ျဖစ္တဲ့.. အီတာလ်ံ လူမ်ိဳး.. WHO က.. ဗမာျပည္မွာ တာ၀န္က် တဲ့ ဆရာ၀န္ တေယာက္ နဲ႕ လက္ထပ္တယ္။ သားေလး ၂ေယာက္ ရတယ္.. စသျဖင့္.. အရြယ္ ေတြ..အရိပ္ေတြ ကိုု.. အရင္ ပံုု ေဖာ္ ၾကည့္ မိတယ္…။

ဧည့္သည္ အတြက္.. ခ်က္ျပဳတ္..စကားလက္ ဆံုု ၾက ရင္း.. နံရံ မွာ ခ်ိတ္ဆြဲ ထားတဲ့.. နန္းဆန္ဆန္ ၀တ္စံုု ေတြနဲ႕.. အဘိုုးအဘြား.. မိသားစုု ပံုု ေတြ က ေန.. သူမရဲ႕ ..ေနာက္ခံ ဘ၀ ေတြ.. သူမ အေဖ အေၾကာင္း ေတြကိုု စိတ္ပါ လက္ပါ ေျပာ ျပ ေနတဲ့.. ရတနာနတ္မယ္ ဟာ.. သူမ အတြက္… အိမ္မက္ဆိုုး..ျဖစ္ခဲ့တဲ့..ဦးေန၀င္း နဲ႕ ပတ္သတ္ တဲ့ အေၾကာင္း ေတြ ကိုုေတာ့.. သိပ္ အမ်ားၾကီး ေျပာခ်င္ပံုု မရ ဘူး လိုု႕ ဆိုု ထားတယ္။

- အဲဒီ အခ်က္ ေတြ ထဲမွာ မွ..သူမ ရဲ႕ အေမ..ထိပ္တင္မလတ္ ဟာ.. ဖခင္ ျဖစ္သူ လင္းပင္ မင္းသားၾကီး ျပည္ေျပး ဘ၀ နဲ႕.. အိႏၵိယ မွာ ေနထိုုင္ ခဲ့ ၾကတဲ့ အခိုုက္.. အထက္တန္း လႊာ အသိုုင္း အ၀ိုုင္း နဲ႕ ၀င္ဆံ့ ခဲ့ ျပီး.. ဂ်ာမဏီ က .. အေရွ႕တိုုင္း တိဗက္ ေတာင္တန္း နိုုင္ငံ တခုုဆီက အိမ္ေရွ႕ မင္းသား တပါး နဲ႕.. ေစ့စပ္ ေၾကာင္းလမ္း တဲ့ အထိ ျဖစ္ ခဲ့ တယ္.. လိုု႕ ဆိုုတယ္။ လက္ထပ္ ပြဲ မတိုုင္ခင္ ရက္ အနည္းငယ္ အလိုုေလး မွာ.. မင္းသား အဆိပ္ခတ္ ခံ ခဲ့ ရလိုု႕.. လြဲ ခဲ့ရတဲ့ အေၾကာင္း ေလး ကလည္း..လြမ္း သလိုုလိုု..ဆန္း သလိုုလိုု..။ ( စကားခ်ပ္ – စာပိုုဒ္ ခ်င္း ေရာေထြး ၍ ဘာသာျပန္ အမွား ျဖစ္သြားတာကိုု ဘိုုဘိုုလန္းစင္ ေထာက္ျပ တဲ့ အတြက္ေၾကာင့္ ျပန္ ျပင္ ထားပါတယ္.. ေက်းဇူးပါ)

ဖတ္ေနရင္း ..မ်က္လံုုး က်ယ္ သြား ျပန္တာက.. သူမ ရဲ႕ အေဖ ငယ္စဥ္ က..ၾကီးပြားရာ ၾကီးပြားေၾကာင္း.. ၾသစေၾတလ် တိုုက္ တေၾကာ.. ေျခဆန္႕ ရင္း.. Kalgoorlie ေရႊေတာ အထိ ေရာက္ခဲ့..ေငြရွာ ခဲ့ တယ္ ဆိုုတဲ့..စာေၾကာင္းေလးပါ.. ။

( စကားခ်ပ္ —- Kalgoorlie ဆိုုတာ…ျမိဳ႕ေတာ္ နဲ႕ အေတာ္လွမ္း တဲ့ … လက္ရွိ..ကိုုယ္ ေနထိုုင္ ေနတဲ့.. ေရႊတြင္း ျမိဳ႕ ကေလး တခုု မိုု႕ပါ..လြန္ခဲ့တဲ့..ႏွစ္ ၁၀၀ ေက်ာ္ေလာက္က.. ေရႊေက်ာၾကီး ေတြ..အၾကီးအက်ယ္ ေပၚလိုု႕..တကမၻာလံုုးက..လူေတြ ေရႊလာရွာ ခဲ့တဲ့.. ေနရာ တခုု ျဖစ္ခဲ့ ဖူးတယ္။ အခုု လည္း..ကမၻာ့ေတာင္ျခမ္း မွာ အၾကီးဆံုုး ေရႊတြင္း ၾကီး ရွိေနေလရဲ႕ )

အဲဒီ မွာ.. မစၥတာ ဘယ္လာမီ တေယာက္.. အသက္ၾကီး မွ ရတဲ့.. သမီးေလး ကိုု.. သူ ငယ္ငယ္က.. ၾကီးျပင္းခဲ့တဲ့.. ၾသစေၾတလ် တိုက္ၾကီး ရဲ႕ ေရေျမ သဘာ၀ ေတြ အေၾကာင္း.. ကာဂူးလီ ဆိုုတဲ့.. ေရႊတြင္းျမိဳ႕ ေလး က.. ထူးဆန္းလွ တဲ့…အျဖဴေရာင္.. ကတၱ၀ါ ၾကီး ေတြ.. အေၾကာင္း..ျမန္မာျပည္က..ၾကက္တူေရႊး အစိမ္း ေလး ေတြ နဲ႕ ယွဥ္ျပီး ေျပာျပ ေနတဲ့ ပံုု ကိုု လည္း ျမင္ေယာင္ ၾကည့္မိ တယ္။

ေနာက္ ေတာ့…ဒုုတိယ ကမၻာစစ္ ျဖစ္..ဂ်ပန္ ၀င္လာတဲ့ အခါ.. သူတိုု႕ မိသားစုု အိႏၵိယ ကိုု စစ္ေျပး တဲ့.. အေၾကာင္း ေတြ.. သာသနာ ျပဳ ေက်ာင္း.. ဆရာမ ေတြ က.. ေသြးေႏွာ ကေလးမေလး ကိုု.. ႏွိမ္ပံုု.. အရွက္ခြဲ ပံုု ေတြ… ျပန္ရြဲ႕ လိုု႕ .. ေက်ာင္းက..အထုုတ္ခံ ရပံုုေတြ …။ ဂ်ပန္ ေတြ ျပန္ထြက္ သြားေတာ့… ၁၄ ႏွစ္ သမီး မွာ.. မိသားစုု လိုုက္ ဗမာျပည္ ျပန္လာ ၾကျပီး.. ေမျမိဳ႕ မွာ..အေျခခ် ေနထိုုင္ တာေတြ…စတဲ့ အေၾကာင္း ေတြ…ကိုု.. တျခား စာအုုပ္ ေတြ ထဲက.. အခ်က္ အလက္ ေတြနဲ႕.. .အစီစဥ္ တက် တြဲ စပ္ျပီး…တင္ျပ ထားပံုု က… စာေရးသူ ဟာ.. June Rose တည္ခင္း တဲ့.. အထူးစပါယ္ရွယ္ ယုုန္သဲေခ် အစာသြပ္ဟင္း ထက္ … သူ မ အေၾကာင္းေတြ ကိုုသာ စိတ္၀င္စား ေနခဲ့ လိုု႕ သာ ေပါ့…။

သူမ ရဲ႕ ေယာက္်ား ဆန္ပံုု.. သြက္လက္ခ်က္ျခာ ပံုု အေၾကာင္း.. မိသားစုုပိုုင္ ကားစုုတ္ကေလး ကိုု ကိုုယ္တိုုင္ အင္ဂ်င္ ႏွိဳး ပံုုကိုု ျမင္ခဲ့ ရတဲ့.. မိသားစုု မိတ္ေဆြ တေယာက္ ရဲ႕ မွတ္တမ္း အပိုုင္းအစ ေလး ကိုုလည္း ထဲ့ေရး ထား ေသးတယ္။ ေနာက္ တခါ..ဗမာျပည္မွာ.. စစ္ျပီးေခတ္က.. ဟိုုးေလး တေၾကာ္.. စိတ္၀င္ စား ခဲ့ ၾကတဲ့.. Purple Plain ရုုပ္ရွင္ မွာ.. ေဟာလိ၀ုုဒ္ မင္းသား ဂေရဂရီပတ္ နဲ႕ တြဲ ဖက္ သရုုပ္ေဆာင္ ဖိုု႕.. ဦးစြာ သေဘာတူ ခဲ့ သူ ျဖစ္ ေၾကာင္း.. လည္း သိလိုုက္ ရတယ္။ အဲဒီ မွာ… ဗမာ့ ယဥ္ေက်း မူ နဲ႕ မေလ်ာ္ တဲ့.. ထုုတ္လုုပ္သူ ဖက္က..ေတာင္းဆိုုခ်က္ ေတြ ေၾကာင့္…သူမ ဖက္က..ဖ်က္သိမ္း ခဲ့ တယ္လိုု႕ ဆိုု တယ္။ အဲဒီ ေနာက္ မွ သာ.. ၀င္းမင္းသန္း နဲ႕သေဘာတူ ျပီး.. ရုုပ္ရွင္ ကိုု ဆက္လက္ ရိုုက္ကူး ခဲ့ တာ ျဖစ္ေပ လိမ့္ မည္။

'It was so Hollywood, it was ridiculous; it was an insult to

anything that had to do with Burma,' she said. 'When the film did come to Burma

there was a big hue and cry. Things in the pagoda, things a Buddhist would never

do.'

 

ေနာက္ ေတာ့.. အီတာလ်ံ လူမ်ိဳး WHO ၀န္ထမ္း ဆရာ၀န္ နဲ႕ အိမ္ေထာင္ က် ရင္း.. လြတ္လပ္ေရး ရခါစ.. ျမန္မာ့ နိုုင္ငံေရး မျငိမ္မသက္ လိွဳင္းေတြ ၾကား.. ကြန္ျမဴနစ္ ေတြက.. သူ႕ အမ်ိဳးသား ကိုု ျပန္ေပး ဆြဲ သြားပံုု ကိုုလည္း.. ျပန္ေျပာင္း ေျပာ ျပ ထား ေသးတယ္။ ျပန္ေပး သမား ကြန္ျမဴနစ္ ေတြ ဟာ.. ေခတ္ပညာတက္ ေက်ာင္းသားေဟာင္း ေတြ ျဖစ္တာ.. သူတိုု႕ မိသားစုု ကိုု ေကာင္းေကာင္း မြန္မြန္ ရွင္းျပ ဆက္ဆံ ခဲ့တာ.. ။ ေနာက္ ေတာ့..သူ႕ အမ်ိဳးသား ျပန္လြတ္ လာတဲ့ ေနာက္..ျမန္မာ အစိုုးရ ကလည္း..သူတိုု႕ကိုု နိုုင္ငံ က..ခြါ ဖိုု႕ အၾကံေပး တာေၾကာင့္… သူ႕ အမ်ိဳးသား တာ၀န္ က် ရာ.. နိုုင္ငံ ရပ္ျခားေတြ မွာ လိုုက္ပါ ေနထိုုင္ ရင္း.. အီတလီ မွာ.. အေျခ ခ် ခဲ့ ၾကတယ္။
- ဦးေန၀င္း နဲ႕.. ဇတ္လမ္း စခဲ့ ပံုု ကိုုေတာ့.. ခပ္ပါးပါး ေလးပဲ.. ေျပာျပ ထား တယ္။ သူ႕ အမ်ိဳးသား နဲ႕ ကြာရွင္းျပတ္စဲ လိုုက္ျပီး သားေလး ၂ ေယာက္ နဲ႕ အတူ အီတလီ မွာပဲ ေနထိုုင္ေနတဲ့ တေလ ွ်ာက္..၁၉ ၆၂ ခုု ႏွစ္ ေနာက္ပိုုင္း.. ဦးေန၀င္း လက္ထပ္မွာ… ျမန္မာျပည္ဟာ.. အထီးက်န္ ဆန္လာတာ.. ဆင္းရဲလာ တာ ေတြကိုု.. မ်က္ေျခမျပတ္ သိျမင္ ေနခဲ့ ျပီး.. သူ႕ဖခင္ ေမျမိဳ႕ မွာ ဆံုုး ေတာ့ လည္း ခဏ တျဖဳတ္ ျပန္လာ နိုုင္ခဲ့ တယ္ ။ ဒါေပမဲ့.. ေနာက္ တေခါက္ .သူ႕ မိခင္ နာမက်န္း ျဖစ္ တဲ့ အခ်ိန္မွာ ေတာ့.. ျမန္မာသံရံုုးက ဗီဇာ ထုုတ္မေပး ခဲ့ ေတာ့ဘူး.. ။ အဲဒီ မွာ.. ကြယ္လြန္သြားျပီ ျဖစ္တဲ့ ဦးေန၀င္း ရဲ႕ ဇနီး ကစ္တီ ဘသန္း နဲ႕ အထက္တန္းလႊာ အသိုုင္း အ၀ိုုင္း တေၾကာ.. ရင္းႏွီး ခဲ့ ဖူး တဲ့ အေလ်ာက္.. ဦးေန၀င္း ဆီကိုု သံၾကိဳး ရိုုက္ အကူအညီ ေတာင္းရာ ကေန… အဆက္အသြယ္ ရ ခဲ့ ျပီး.. သိပ္မၾကာခင္ ၁၉ ၇၈ မွာ.. လက္ထပ္ လိုုက္ ၾကတယ္။ အဲဒီ လက္ထပ္ပြဲ က.. ခပ္ရိုုးရိုုး သာ ျဖစ္ ခဲ့ ေၾကာင္း ကိုုလည္း… 'It was not one of those lavish things.'လိုု႕ သူမ က.. ဆိုုတယ္။
ဦးေန၀င္းက..ဘာေၾကာင့္ ရတနာ နတ္မယ္ ကိုု လက္ထပ္ခဲ့ သလည္း.. ရတနာ နတ္မယ္ လိုု႕ အသိမ်ားတဲ့…June Rose ကလည္း ဘာေၾကာင့္ ဦးေန၀င္း ရဲ႕ လက္ထပ္ခြင့္ ကိုု လြယ္လြယ္ ကူကူ လက္ခံ ခဲ့သလည္း ဆိုုတာ.. ကာယကံ ရွင္မ်ားသာ.. အေၾကာင္းမွန္ ကိုု သိ နိုုင္မယ္ ျဖစ္ ေပမဲ့.. ဒီ ေဆာင္းပါးေလး ထဲက.. သူမ ရဲ႕ စကား တခ်ိဳ႕ ကေတာ့..စိတ္၀င္စား စရာ ေကာင္း ေန ခဲ့တာ အမွန္ ပါပဲ။

'Had I been able to do anything, had it served a purpose, had something been

able to be done – but I realise I saw too many things,'

 

ဘယ္သူ႕ကိုု မွ တိုုင္တည္ျခင္း မရွိ တဲ့ ေမးခြန္း ဆန္ဆန္.. အေျဖ မပါ တဲ့.. စကားတခ်ိဳ႕ က …ရည္မွန္းထားတာ ေတြ ကိုု.. က်မ ေဆာင္ရြက္ နိုုင္ ခဲ့ သလား.. တခုုု ခုု ျပီးေျမာက္ ခဲ့ သလား … တဲ့။

အဲဒီ အေၾကာင္း ေတြ ေရာက္လာ တဲ့ အခါ မွာ ေတာ့..စိတ္လွဳပ္ရွား ေနဟန္ ရွိတဲ့.. June Rose ဟာ.. ေန႕လည္စာ တည္ခင္း ခဲ့တဲ့ ပန္းကန္ ေတြကိုု.. ေရစင္ ထဲကိုု အသံ ျမည္ေအာင္ ထဲ့ ေန ခဲ့တယ္။.. ၀ိုုင္ အစား ဘီယာ တလံုုး ကိုု ဆြဲယူ လိုုက္ ရင္း.. ဗမာလူမ်ိဳး ေတြ ပါးစပ္ ဖ်ား မွာ… ခ်ိဳခ်ဥ္ တခုု လိုု တျမံဳ႕ျမံဳ႕ နဲ႕ ေျပာေကာင္း ေနခဲ့ မဲ့.. သူ႕ ဇာတ္လမ္း ကိုု ရယ္သြမ္း ေသြး လိုုက္ ေသး တယ္။

'I think – and people say it, which is why I can say it – I was a sort of lollipop for the people,' she says. 'Whatever average people say about me or my Anglo half, the family name is still very important in Burma, the royalty, the Limbin.'

 

လူတိုုင္းလိုု ၾကားဖူးခဲ့ တဲ့.. အေနာက္နိုုင္ငံ ရဲ႕ စပိုုင္ လုုပ္လိုု႕.. ဦးေန၀င္းက.. ေမာင္းထုုတ္ ခဲ့ တယ္ ဆိုု တဲ့..ေကာလဟာရ ကိုု ေမး ေတာ့…သူမ က.. ရယ္ေန ခဲ့တယ္။ ဒါေပမဲ့.. သူမ ကိုု ဦးေန၀င္းက.. ေဆးလိပ္ ျပာခြက္ နဲ႕ ပစ္ေပါက္ ခဲ့ တယ္ ဆိုု တဲ့… မႏွစ္ျမိဳ႕စရာ.. ျဖစ္ရပ္ ကိုု ေတာ့.. သူမ က.. နာနာက်င္က်င္ ..၀န္ခံ ခဲ့ တယ္။

 

'Okay, so he did fling the bloody ashtray. I can't deny it, because there were servants and obviously it is the servants who are talking today…There was an ashtray, but it didn't hit me between the eyes and I'm still alive. But it's not the ashtray. It is the last drop in the glass, the

last straw.'

 

ေနာက္ တေန႕ ခ်က္ျခင္းပဲ.. သူမဟာ.. စင္းလံုုးေလယဥ္ တစင္း နဲ႕ ျမန္မာျပည္က..ထြက္ခြါ လာနိုုင္ ခဲ့ တယ္။ လက္ထပ္ အျပီး..၅ လ ဆိုုတဲ့ အခ်ိန္တိုုေလး အတြင္း မွာပဲ ..လ်င္လ်င္ ျမန္ျမန္ ျဖစ္ပ်က္ သြား ခဲ့တဲ့..အဲဒီ.. အေၾကာင္း ေတြ ကိုု.. သူမက.. Sin of Pride လိုု႕ ဆိုု ခဲ့ ျပီး… သူမ ကိုု ေမ ွ်ာ္လင့္ ခဲ့တဲ့ လူေတြ အတြက္ ဘာမွ မေဆာင္ရြက္ နိုုင္ပဲ.. အရွံဳး နဲ႕ သက္သက္ ထြက္ခြါ ခဲ့ ရ တာ ျဖစ္တယ္ လိုု႕ ျပန္ေျပာင္း ဖြင့္ဟ ခဲ့ တယ္။

I left Burma with a definite feeling of failure,' June Rose says now. 'Because I had failed my people. Because they did put their trust in me when I arrived. And this was one of the things that was not liked. But I would rather I left as a failurethan to be connected with the ruling people. Those who had trusted in me, those who believed in me can say she left, but she left rather than not be able to do anything. In Italian, they say un peccato di orgoglio; in English, a sin of pride. Because I thought I could do something which others had not done. And that's a very bad sin.'

 

၅ လာတာ ၾကံဳဆံုု ခဲ့ ရ တဲ့ ဦးေန၀င္း ကိုုေတာ့…တကယ့္ ညဏ္နီညဏ္နက္ နဲ႕ အရာရာ ကိုု ၾကိဳးကိုုင္ ျခယ္လွယ္နိုုင္သူ ၾကီး တေယာက္ လိုု႕ သာ.. မွတ္ခ်က္ ျပဳ ထားတယ္။

He was always the éminence gris. He wasalways the one who was manipulating everybody. It was too convenient,' she said.

 

" ဦးေန၀င္း နဲ႕ ရက္ ၁၀၀" ဆိုု တဲ့.. စာအုုပ္ ဟာ အဲဒီေခတ္ သံတမန္ ေလာက မွာ..တီးတိုုး ေရပန္း စား ခဲ့ ေပမဲ့.. အဲဒီ ေန႕ လည္ မွာ ေတာ့… မိဘ ဘိုုးဘြား ေတြ နဲ႕ ၾကီးျပင္း ခဲ့ တဲ့ အေၾကာင္း ေတြ ကလြဲရင္.. အာဏာရွင္ ၾကီး နဲ႕ ပတ္သတ္တဲ့ အေၾကာင္း ေတြ ကိုု ေရးဖိုု႕ စိတ္ကူး မရွိ ပါဘူး လိုု႕.. သူမ က.. ျငင္းဆိုု ခဲ့တယ္။

လတ္တေလာ မွာ.. အီတာလ်ံ နဲ႕ အေရွ႕တိုုင္း အစားအစာ အခ်က္အျပဳတ္သင္တန္း ေက်ာင္း ကိုု ဖြင့္လွစ္ ထားျပီး… မၾကာေသးခင္ ႏွစ္ေတြက ေတာ့.. သူမ ရဲ႕ အသက္ အစိတ္ ရွိျပီ ျဖစ္တဲ့ ေျမးေလး နဲ႕ အတူ.. ျမန္မာျပည္ ကိုု ျပန္ အလည္ ေရာက္ ခဲ့ ေသးတယ္ လိုု႕ ဆိုုတယ္။ ..ျမန္မာျပည္တြင္းက.. ဆရာ၀န္ ေတြ နဲ႕..လူမူ ေရး လုုပ္ငန္း တခ်ိဳ႕ တြဲဖက္ လုုပ္ကိုုင္ ေန သလိုု… လြန္ခဲ့တဲ့ ႏွစ္ ပိုုင္းက..ျဖစ္ပြားခဲ့ တဲ့..နာဂစ္ မုုန္တိုုင္း ေဘး ကယ္ဆယ္ေရး လုုပ္ငန္း မွာ လည္း.. ပါ၀င္ ေဆာင္ရြက္ ေန တဲ့ အေၾကာင္း… သူမ ရဲ႕ ဧည့္ခန္း မွာ … တခန္းတနား ခ်ိတ္ဆြဲ ထားတဲ့..အျဖဴ အမဲ မိသားစုု ပံုု ေတြ ရဲ႕ ေဘးက.. ျမန္မာျပည္..ေက်းရြာ တခုု က..ျပန္လည္ တည္ေဆာက္ေရး လုုပ္ငန္း တခုု ရဲ႕ ေရာင္စံုု ဓါတ္ပံုု နဲ႕ ဆက္စပ္ ၾကည့္ ရင္း… တခ်ိန္က..ရတနာ နတ္မယ္ ဆိုု တဲ့.. ကေနာင္မင္း ရဲ႕ ျမစ္ေတာ္ အသက္ ၇၇ ႏွစ္ အရြယ္ အမ်ိဳးသမီး ၾကီး အေၾကာင္း ေတြး ေန မိ ပါ တယ္။

Original article : Between Two Worlds

ျဖည့္စြက္ခ်က္ -

သူ႕မ ရဲ႕ ပံုုေတြ အမ်ားၾကီး ညီလင္းဆက္ ဘေလာ့ မွာ လည္း ရွိပါတယ္။ အခုု ၀ီကီျမန္မာက ပံုုကိုုေတာင္ ညီလင္းဆက္ ဆီက..ယူထားတယ္ လိုု႕ ေရးထားပါတယ္။

ေနာက္တခ်က္က…ဒီစာကိုု.. မူရင္း ေဆာင္းပါးပါ..စာေရးသူ ရဲ႕ ျပင္ပ အျမင္.. ကာယကံ ရွင္ သူမ ရ႕ဲ စကား လံုုး မ်ား အတိုုင္းသာ ဘာသာျပန္ နားလည္သလိုု ေရးထားတာ ျဖစ္တဲ့ အတြက္..သူမ ရဲ႕ ဖက္ ကသာ ခံစား ဖတ္ရွဳ နိုုင္ပါ လိမ့္မယ္။ ေျပာခဲ့သလိုု..ဒီစာကိုု.. သူမ အတြက္ ကာကြယ္ ေရွ႕ေန လိုုက္ဖိုု႕ ေရးတာ မဟုုတ္သလိုု.. ဘာေနာက္ခံ အေၾကာင္းမွ မပါ.. ၾကိဳတင္သတ္မွတ္ခ်က္ မပါ.. ကိုုယ္ပိုုင္ ထင္ျမင္ခ်က္ မပါ ေအာင္..တတ္နိုုင္ သေလာက္ ျပန္ေရးထား တာပါ..။

စာဖတ္သူ မ်ား..မူရင္း အတိုုင္း ခံစားနိုုင္ရန္သာ ရည္ရြယ္ပါတယ္။ တကယ္ စိတ္၀င္စား ရင္ေတာ့..မူရင္းကိုု ဖတ္ၾကည့္ေစခ်င္တာပါပဲ။

It is chilly in Florence when we get off the fast train up from Rome. The calories from the rushed breakfast, the café latte in the dining car as the sere landscape whizzed by, are fast wearing off as our taxi crosses the river and winds through the narrow lanes of the old San Frediano district of artisan workshops.

In Via Camaldoli, we find a plain two-storey shopfront that bears the nameplate Associazione Culturale Arte e Gastronomia Orientale. Since 1983, the association has provided cooking classes in English and Italian, teaching locals the finer points of Italian and Asian cooking.

The door is opened by a woman of nearly seventy-seven with the fine features of a great beauty, the hair now grey, recognisable from the photographs of a bygone era in a far-off land of sweeping rivers, layers of blue mountains and paddy fields. She is wearing an ankle-length tight woollen skirt in a tartan pattern, with a blue cashmere top.

'It's tartan in your honour,' June Rose Bellamy, also known as Yadana Nat Mai, says with a huge smile. 'I like to dress in Burmese style but you've got
to face it, it's cold here!' It's obviously warm, but also quite oriental in effect, a winter version of the figure-hugging sarong and blouse of South-East Asia.

We walk in, past drawings of horses – the passion of her father, an Australian bookmaker – and Asian artefacts; past framed formal portraits in black-and-white and sepia of Asian people in lavish formal dress, and new colour photos of a village aid project in Burma; and past a big table set for lunch, with an enticing orange flan heavy with a luscious-looking sauce waiting on a floral dish in the middle.

We sit in a sofa and armchair under the portraits. But Bellamy is constantly breaking off to disappear into the kitchen. Eventually we follow, into a large space of grey marble chopping surfaces, hanging pots and pans, and a huge stainless-steel cooking range, and settle around the kitchen table.

'Have you tasted really good Tuscan new oil?' Bellamy asks. 'This one comes from the house of a friend of mine, and I would say it's this year's very best.' Slices of bread are brought toasted on a metal grid over a gas burner – 'You never get a toaster that gives you a taste of the flame' – and we dip into a dish of very light green oil.

It tastes light, a little grassy. 'It comes from higher up in the hills, and it's made by a fanatic. He even removes the stone from the olive: it is made from just the pulp, and his home growth is of only one type of olive. To be doing it properly you should be tasting without the bread, just off a spoon, but I won't put you through that. When I tasted it, I almost lost a friend, because I said that it wasn't olive-y. It's very good, but I think it's got something to do with removing the stone. Maybe that was in my head. It's very light.'

IN MANDALAY BURMA of the nineteenth century, the scholarly and pious Mindon was made king in 1853 with the help of his warrior brother Kanaung Min, to start last-minute reforms to stave off the encroaching European powers, as the legendary King Mongkut was doing in neighbouring Siam. But in 1866 Kanaung Min was killed in a bloody takeover attempt by Mindon's own sons. The Prince of Limbin, a son of Kanaung Min, was smuggled to safety.

By 1885, as British steamboats packed with soldiers came up the Irrawaddy to storm the vast Mandalay fort-palace, depose the last king and exile him to India, the Limbin prince had grown up and become the figurehead of a rebellious confederacy of Shan princes, who turned from fighting the Burmese to opposing the British. In 1887, the prince was forced to surrender when the Shans did a deal with the British, and he too was exiled.

One of his daughters, Princess Ma Lat – June Rose Bellamy's mother – was born in Calcutta in 1894, and later attended high school in Allahabad, mixing in high society. She met the German crown prince, the future Kaiser Wilhelm, who thought her the most striking woman he encountered on his Asian tour. She was betrothed to the young ruler of Sikkim, but he was poisoned eight days before their wedding. Further attempts to arrange a marriage were abandoned. Small and exquisite, with a will of steel, the princess was a free spirit whom nobody liked to counter.

A NEW OIL is produced. 'This I find a typically good oil: it comes from this area, a little high; it has more body,' Bellamy says. 'The previous one was super-delicate; you tend to get lost. You couldn't possibly cook with it. Even if you used it in a salad or something like that, it would get lost in the food. To me, this is Tuscany. It's not for sale; they only make enough for the house, and they give a bottle to friends; it's very smooth, a nice artichoke taste.' It is indeed very flavoursome, without the sharpness that catches the back of the throat with most olive oils.

As British guns crushed Burmese independence, Herbert Bellamy, born in 1878 to English migrants, was growing up in Victoria. He ranged across the goldfields as far as Kalgoorlie, making and losing money, augmenting his funds from wins in professional sprint races and organising boxing bouts. He tried running sheep but couldn't stand the smell of them, and concentrated instead on his racehorses. After excursions to London and France, Bellamy became a fixture on an Asian circuit between Bombay, Calcutta and Batavia (Jakarta), as both breeder and bookmaker.

One day he was chatting with the Sultan of Johore in Malaya, a friend with a common interest in dog fighting. 'Y'know, Bellamy, you should go to Burma,' said the sultan. 'It's an interesting country. Maybe you could do something about horses there.' Bellamy went, fell in love with the country and settled at the Rangoon racecourse.

After World War I, the Limbin prince was allowed to return to Burma and his extensive family settled in Rangoon. They were anachronisms in a booming new state of mines, rice exports, railways and the famous steamboats of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company. Ma Lat attended the races and went to place a bet, where she met the expat Australian: the attraction was instant.

Maurice Collis, a colonial judge and author, wrote in his 1938 book Trials in Burma of receiving a call from Ma Lat in 1928. 'She sat on the sofa, a beautiful woman, in a blue silk skirt and a jacket of white lawn, her complexion corn-coloured, her eyes large and brilliant, and with exquisite hands.' She asked him to wed her and Bellamy.

The marriage took place on 18 October at 4.48 pm, a time fixed as auspicious by an astrologer. 'She was dressed reminiscent of the court of Mandalay in a royal hta-mein of oyster-coloured silk set with silver diamante; her hair, in the loose tail style, was charged with orchids and there were pearls winding at her throat and breast. She came forward slowly, waving a white fan, with a look of dignity and emotion on her face. Mr Bellamy followed in a morning coat. The ceremony of civil marriage is exceedingly bald, for it consists of hardly more than the taking of oaths. When some documents are signed it is all over. On this occasion its abruptness seemed almost rude. I declared them married and took Ma Lat's hand. The occasion seemed to be strange and disturbing. Had the rape of Mandalay ended in this?'

BELLAMY BRINGS ANOTHER dish of dark brown paste, made by her pupils. 'Now this is 110 per cent Florentine, Tuscan,' she says. 'It's made from chicken livers. Traditionally it should be made from the spleen, but you try to get an American tourist to stand there and get blood out of the spleen. So we do it with the liver. This is country food, what you serve before the meal. There is not a single part of the animal which is not used.' She brings out a bottle of Il Principe pinot nero, from a vineyard named after Machiavelli.

June Rose was born in 1932, and given the name Yadana Nat Mai (Goddess of the Nine Jewels) as well as her English one. She began an idyllic childhood between the two cultures of her parents. 'Mummy was still very much within the laws of what was her due, what was her right, as royalty,' she said. 'At home we spoke Burmese – not the Burmese that ordinary Burmese speak, but court Burmese. I grew up speaking that, and English, and Hindi. I lived on one side very Buddhist. We never wore our shoes upstairs. The food for the monks was prepared first thing every morning. When it came the time for the festivals, my father would disappear hunting. From his side, we had Christmas trees, we had Easter bunnies; I rode, and I shot. What Buddhist shoots?'

June Rose was very close to her father, who set up bamboo hurdles for her in the yard, told her yarns about his time in the Australian bush and read her Henry Lawson's poems. 'I can tell you everything about Kalgoorlie, the Southern Cross; I can tell you about the half-bald cockatoo in the pub in whose cup people would pour beer, and when the parrot was sloshed he'd say: "Give me another feather and I'll fly."'

In February 1942, when June Rose was nine, the idyll ended. Japanese bombers raided Rangoon as the prelude to occupation, narrowly missing the Bellamy house, and the family were evacuated to India. They settled in Allahabad, the sleepy North Indian city at the junction of the Ganges and Yamuna rivers, where the religious gathering of the Kumbh Mela, the largest human assembly in the world, occurs every twelve years.

The city was also home to the Nehru family. An aunt, one of the Limbin prince's other daughters, had married an Indian maharajah allied with Jawaharlal Nehru's independence struggle and who was with him in the Allahabad jail. June Rose went along when her aunt visited. 'My uncle was in one cell, and there was water on the floor with the fan blowing on the water to keep cool. Four doors down was Nehru,' she recalls. 'When I saw the film Gandhi I had to see it again. The first time I cried all the way through.'

June Rose was sent to a convent school in Kalimpong at eleven, where Herbert Bellamy's influence was her downfall. A nun who clearly looked down on mixed-race children was giving a geography lesson about Australia, and sarcastically asked June Rose if she'd left anything off the map on the blackboard. June Rose put a dot in the centre. 'Baragarawindy,' she told the class, 'is dream country; it is the land of opposites, the rivers flow inland instead of out, the leaves grow upwards instead of down, the snakes have feathers and the crows fly backwards to keep the dust out of their eyes.' She was expelled.

At fourteen, she returned with her parents to a wrecked and bombed Rangoon. Her father went into semi-retirement in the British-built hill station of Maymyo, outside Mandalay, where teak and brick houses in a vaguely Tudor style sit amid lawns and beds of roses and sweet peas. Bellamy ran a few horses, disappeared to his hunting lodge in the forests and collected rare orchids. The shrinking British community looked down on him as a bookie and colonial; they and the Burmese sniffed at mixed-race families; but both communities had to open their doors because of Ma Lat's royal lineage. 'On one hand that put me in a privileged position but at the same time it raised my gall, because I was no better than any other Anglo-Burman,' June Rose explains.

She was growing into a noted beauty. The English travel writer Norman Lewis met the Bellamy family at a party in Maymyo, and in his 1955 book, Golden Earth, called Herbert Bellamy 'a man of genial and confidential manner' and Ma Lat a 'still handsome' woman with an expression of inner amusement. June Rose 'allied to the graceful beauty of the Burmese a quite European vivacity'. And practicality: 'When the family were about to leave, in an elderly and ailing British car, June Rose showed much skill in locating a short in the wiring, and much tomboyish energy in winding the starting handle until the engine fired.'

Winning an essay competition, June Rose was given a three-month tour of the United States as a prize, and flourished on what passed for the social circuit in the fragile yet hopeful fifteen years after Burma's independence, in 1946, when democracy faltered amid repeated insurgencies. She was a contender for a role in the war movie The Purple Plain, as the young Burmese nurse who gives a suicidal pilot (played by Gregory Peck) an interest in life, but says she pulled out during the shooting in Ceylon. 'It was so Hollywood, it was ridiculous; it was an insult to anything that had to do with Burma,' she said. 'When the film did come to Burma there was a big hue and cry. Things in the pagoda, things a Buddhist would never do.'

In 1954 she married Mario Postiglione, a young Italian doctor working on malaria prevention with the World Health Organization. Seven months after the birth of the first of their two sons, Mario was kidnapped by Burmese communists. 'They were all well-educated – former students,' June Rose said. '"We have nothing against you or him," they said, "and how is your royal mother and your son?" It happened during the visit of [the Soviet leaders] Khruschev and Bulganin to Burma. "We want the world to know the government has no control of the country. We need the money to buy the arms. Too bad it's your husband." After we got him back, the UN told us to get out of Burma.'

June Rose went with Mario to WHO postings in Damascus, Geneva and Manila. From the Philippines, she was able to fly back to Rangoon to be with her father when he died, in 1963.

NOW COMES THE main course. June Rose moves to the oven and pulls out a large covered dish. Inside is a roll of meat, surrounded by small potatoes roasted a dark golden-brown in a coating of oil and pan juices. 'Rabbit – isn't he gorgeous?' she says. 'This is very typical of Tuscany. This is another one of those dishes that make country food interesting, because a little has to go a long way. It's actually a very small rabbit, but he's been pounded flat to make him double his size, and inside you have pancake, the liver minced up and fried with onions. So from three eggs and one rabbit you can feed eight to ten people.' From a bench top, she produces the greens, a circular flan of shredded zucchini. We set to, with topped-up glasses of Il Principe.

IN ITALY, JUNE Rose and Mario divorced, and she was raising their two boys, Michael and Maurice, when she learned that Ma Lat was gravely ill after a stroke. By then, Burma had become isolated after the army chief, General Ne Win, seized power in 1962 and stepped up the ongoing wars against the many domestic insurgents.

'I couldn't get a visa, so I sent Ne Win a telegram – I'd known him for years; I was a very good friend of his wife, Katie; we'd always sort of kept in touch,' she said. 'So I cabled him: "Mummy critical. Rome embassy incapable of giving me a visa. Please help." The embassy called and said I didn't even have to go to them: they'd meet me at the airport. But in the meantime I got a cable saying mother had died. So I didn't go back. I wrote and thanked him. I would have done anything to see my mother, but to go and collect her ashes…

'A year later he came to Europe. And we met. I thanked him for
what he'd done. I discovered that Katie had died. And that was how our connection started. He asked what I was doing here. I mentioned my children, my divorce. He said I should go back to Burma. To do what? This thing went backwards and forwards, and on another trip he proposed. I hadn't been back to Burma; all this happened here.' She went to Rangoon in 1978, and they were married. 'It was not one of those lavish things.'

June Rose is distracted, edgy as she talks. She looks for the small bottle of beer she has been drinking instead of wine. She gets up and clears the plates, clattering noisily in the sink.

IN THE LATE 1970s, Ne Win and his military regime were losing international respectability. Earlier, the anti-communist general had been useful to the West, and his isolationist economic policies and authoritarianism not so unusual. Gough Whitlam had even brought him to Canberra on an official visit in 1974.

Now the dance with Deng Xiaoping's China had begun. The rest of South-East Asia was starting to pull ahead. Ne Win's superstition and his fascination with lessons from Burma's, blood-soaked history were becoming obsessive.

But he was still an attractive man, recalls Pamela Gutman, a Sydney scholar of Burma who finished her doctorate on the cultural history of Burma's Arakan state about that time. She presented her visa and an introductory letter at Ne Win's gate, after being studied by a periscope that appeared over the wall and swivelled in her direction. A dinner followed, with Ne Win serving game he'd just shot up in Shan state, along with a bottle of sweet German wine – a taste he'd evidently developed on his annual trips to spas and physicians in Germany and Austria. The conversation was desultory, with the leader consulting a colonel often about what he should say. Bizarrely, it ended with Ne Win suggesting an Australia-Burma cultural agreement. The Australian ambassador was excited. 'What sort of scotch does he drink? I'll send a case in.'

Ne Win thought marriage to June Rose would be advantageous. 'All the locals would say it was a good thing because she had royal blood, and legitimised his regime,' Gutman said. June Rose agrees. 'I think – and people say it, which is why I can say it – I was a sort of lollipop for the people,' she says. 'Whatever average people say about me or my Anglo half, the family name is still very important in Burma, the royalty, the Limbin.'

In her mind, June Rose says, was the idea of doing some good for the country. But she admits failure, though she won't talk about any of the conversations or issues she had with Ne Win. She suggests that he was barely in control of his regime by that point.

'Had I been able to do anything, had it served a purpose, had something been able to be done – but I realise I saw too many things,' she says. 'He was being taken for a ride by his people. We're not talking about manipulation, but being put in a position where you don't know everything. You think you know everything, but a dictatorship in a country like Burma, as long as it is, with all the different tribes – each command is a watertight compartment.'

Ne Win never felt he was out of the loop. 'Oh, they weren't that stupid. Neither was the media, which needed a scapegoat. He was always the éminence gris. He was always the one who was manipulating everybody. It was too convenient,' she said.

'But all you have to think is that when he died [in 2002, after being sidelined by his army peers in the wake of the 1988 uprising], he died alone, abandoned, ignored. And something that would be impossible for a normal Buddhist or a Burmese to conceive: he was buried the same day without a friendly soul by the graveside. After all that time? What were they hiding? Why did they have to get him out of the way as fast as possible? To cover up things. They did what the British did – do you know my grandfather's grave didn't have a name on it? He was to be forgotten.'

The marriage ended after just five months. June Rose won't go into the cause of the final rupture. Gutman says the rumour is that Ne Win was entertaining one of his wartime Japanese mentors, who was by then working for a trading company, when June Rose mentioned the worsening state of Burma's economy. June Rose laughs at another popular rumour, that Ne Win suspected she was a western spy.

She does confirm that it ended when Ne Win threw an ashtray at her. 'It was one of those things that happened. Rage. Anger. I know why, but on the other hand I don't. It's something that is too questionable. The fact remains that yes, there was a physical attack, but even that is not simple,' she says. 'Okay, so he did fling the bloody ashtray. I can't deny it, because there were servants and obviously it is the servants who are talking today…There was an ashtray, but it didn't hit me between the eyes and I'm still alive. But it's not the ashtray. It is the last drop in the glass, the last straw.'

June Rose left the next day, seen off by Ne Win's daughter, Sanda (now jailed for corruption by Ne Win's successors), and a guard of honour as she flew out in what was then Burma's only passenger plane certified for international routes. Word of the marriage breakdown had not spread. Ne Win had gone up country. She felt lucky to get out.

'I LEFT BURMA with a definite feeling of failure,' June Rose says now. 'Because I had failed my people. Because they did put their trust in me when I arrived. And this was one of the things that was not liked. But I would rather I left as a failure than to be connected with the ruling people. Those who had trusted in me, those who believed in me can say she left, but she left rather than not be able to do anything. In Italian, they say un peccato di orgoglio; in English, a sin of pride. Because I thought I could do something which others had not done. And that's a very bad sin.'

June Rose has written an engaging essay about her family and upbringing, but says she won't write about her time with the dictator. 'To say something, to write a book, one would have to have a very good knowledge of Burmese history, culture, and a super-excellent knowledge of the construction of a military dictatorship,' she said. 'You can't put all that in a book. You'd bore people to death.'

Gutman says that there was talk among diplomats of the time that June Rose had indeed written, or was about to write, a book titled 'One Hundred Days with Ne Win' but was persuaded not to publish by a sizable settlement with Rangoon. In Florence there is comfort, but no sign of wealth. Her shopfront school of Burmese and Italian cooking, with her apartment upstairs, provides a modest living and is gaining a reputation on the self-education tourism circuit. Her charitable work, through Rangoon-based doctors, is putting young Burmese students through medical school and helping a village hit by last year's Cyclone Nargis.

Her younger son, Maurice, died in a motor accident some years ago; but his son, Alex, twenty-five, is now close to her, as is her older son, Michael. Two years ago, she and Alex went to Burma and found the grave of her grandfather, the Limbin prince, in a monastery. At 5 am, when the earth's energy is said to be at its peak, they paid homage by serving the morning meal to the ten abbots and 120 monks. Alex, who had never been to Burma and until then seemed completely Italian, said he felt at home. 'I didn't feel I was visiting,' he told her. 'Everything we do at your home in Florence, people are doing all around us here.'

June Rose says she still tries to lead a Buddhist life. 'But the other day we went to a fun fair, and I was still able to topple off, without my glasses, a barrel at the shooting range.'

We eat the orange flan. It is soft and creamy, with a heavy flavour like curaçao liqueur.

Suddenly we realise it is mid-afternoon. We leave the half-world of Burma, pioneering Australia and Cold War diplomacy that the lunch has conjured up, and step into the subdued light of wintry Tuscany. June Rose farewells us, beaming as she did on our arrival.  

ကမၻာႏွစ္ခုု ၾကားက.. ရတနာနတ္မယ္ by KAY

 

 



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Shamala case: Objection raised, decision postponed

Posted: 03 May 2010 07:09 AM PDT

UPDATED 2.45PM Lawyer Muralee Menon argues that S Shamala has no right to be heard, as she has 'committed contempt of court', and the Federal Court...
Shamala, 37, had married Jeyaganesh, 41, in 1998 according to Hindu rites and their marriage was registered under the Law Reform (Marriage and Divorce) Act 1976. Four years later, in 2002, Jeyaganesh embraced Islam and took the name Muhammad Ridzwan Mogarajahand.

Muhammad Ridzwan Mogarajahand then converted Saktiwaran and Theiviswaran, then aged three and two, to Islam without Shamala's knowledge and consent.

Another sad story of religion dividing a family where children become pawns...


renungan.

Posted: 03 May 2010 07:09 AM PDT

APABILA roh keluar daripada jasad, ia akan berkata-kata dan seluruh isi alam sama ada di langit atau bumi akan mendengarnya, kecuali jin dan manusia. Apabila mayat dimandikan, lalu roh berkata:

"Wahai orang yang memandikan, aku minta kepadamu kerana Allah untuk melepaskan pakaianku dengan perlahan-lahan, sebab pada saat ini aku beristirahat daripada seretan malaikat maut". Selepas itu, mayat pula bersuara sambil merayu: "Wahai orang yang memandikan, janganlah engkau menuangkan airmu dalam keadaan panas. Begitu juga jangan menuangnya dengan air yang dingin kerana tubuhku terbakar apabila terlepasnya roh daripada tubuh".

Apabila dimandikan, roh sekali lagi merayu: "Demi Allah, wahai orang yang memandikan jangan engkau menggosok aku dengan kuat sebab tubuhku luka-luka dengan keluarnya roh". Selepas dimandi dan dikafankan, telapak kaki mayat diikat dan ia pun memanggil-manggil dan berpesan lagi supaya jangan diikat terlalu kuat serta mengkafan kepalanya kerana ingin melihat wajahnya sendiri, anak-anak, isteri atau suami buat kali terakhir kerana tidak dapat melihat lagi sampai hari kiamat.


Sebaik keluar dari rumah lalu ia berpesan: "Demi Allah, wahai jemaahku, aku telah meninggalkan isteriku menjadi balu. Maka janganlah kamu menyakitinya. Anak-anakku menjadi yatim dan janganlah kalian menyakiti mereka.


"Sesungguhnya pada hari ini aku telah keluar dari rumahku dan aku tidak akan dapat kembali kepada mereka buat selama-lamanya." Sesudah mayat diletakkan pada pengusung, sekali lagi diserunya kepada jemaah supaya jangan mempercepatkan mayatnya ke kubur selagi belum mendengar suara anak-anak dan sanak saudara buat kali terakhir.

Sesudah dibawa dan melangkah sebanyak tiga langkah dari rumah, roh pula berpesan: "Wahai Kekasihku, wahai saudaraku dan wahai anak-anakku, jangan kamu diperdaya dunia sebagaimana ia memperdayakan aku dan janganlah kamu lalai ketika ini sebagaimana ia melalaikanaku.

"Sesungguhnya aku tinggalkan apa yang aku telah aku kumpulkan untuk warisku dan sedikitpun mereka tidak mahu menanggung kesalahanku. Adapun di dunia, Allah menghisab aku, padahal kamu berasa senang dengan keduniaan. Dan mereka juga tidak mahu mendoakan aku."


Busy week ahead

Posted: 03 May 2010 06:42 AM PDT

After enjoying myself silly last Saturday on my 17+++ birthday, visiting the place where I spent my teenage years, this week is going to be a rather busy week.

Will be driving to KL early tomorrow morning to attend a seminar on Women, Girls and HIV in Malaysia. The seminar will end by lunch time; but I am a little bit confused as to whether I need to stay on after that. In the earlier email that I got, the tentative programme only mentioned about the seminar. Then a fax came in, and the tentative programme included a "Mesyuarat Jawatankuasa Pasukan Petugas HIV/AIDS Wanita dan Remaja Perempuan". I remember being called for a meeting before which I couldn't attend, and so now I'm not sure if I'm supposed to attend this meeting. I hope I don't have to… at least I can leave KL before office hours end!

On Thursday I have to attend a meeting of the Jawatankuasa Kempen Kesedaran & Pencegahan (for schools) here in Ipoh.

Friday – I got an invitation by the club sponsoring groceries for Sofie's and Lin's families, to attend their AGM. It seems they want to acknowledge my contribution in delivering the groceries to the 2 families. But I had already promised to bring Saiful to get his pair of glasses; and to me that is more important, and so I had to turn down the AGM invitation.

Saturday – Our exhibition at a hotel in Ipoh in conjunction with a conference held by the Perak Palliative Care Society. My shift will be in the afternoon so at least I can go to the pasar tani in the morning after missing my Saturday morning routine last week.

Sunday – the exhibition is still on until afternoon but I have already left it to my vice-chairman to handle the exhibition (since he's the coordinator for public awareness programmes). I and 4 other volunteers will be taking part in a charity run. Yep, we will be running 2km each for charity. And as my own personal run-up to the charity run, last Saturday I volunteered to play volleyball in a Under-60s vs Under 16s game at my alma-mater. After the volleyball game ended, I was just trying to "lepas gian" hitting some balls with the hockey stick. As I was about to return the hockey stick, I was pulled in to play hockey as well (in a much smaller field and in a much shorter time).

The good thing is, I still feel okay after the 2 games, and so I think I should be doing okay for the 2 km run. I know I can walk 2 km, so worse comes to worse, I'll walk!

So looks like I only have Wednesday free this week…


Malaysia Ditangga Corot Indeks Kebebasan Media

Posted: 03 May 2010 06:27 AM PDT

Media di Malaysia masih lagi tidak bergerak bebas dan berada dalam cengkaman kerajaan Umno-Barisan Nasional seperti mana yang terbukti oleh kajian Freedom House yang meletakkan Malaysia pada tangga ke-141 dari 196 buah negara.

Kedudukan Malaysia itu di bawah kategori 32 peratus negara yang tidak mempunyai media yang bebas dalam menyampaikan maklumat sebenar kepada rakyat.

Menurut kajian tersebut, Malaysia berkongsi tempat dengan dua negara Afrika, Algeria dan Zambia.

Di rantau Asia Pasifik pula kedudukan Malaysia masih ketinggalan di belakang negara terdekat seperti Filipina pada berada pada tangga ke-97, Indonesia - 107, Thailand - 124 dan Kemboja - 134.

Filipina, Indonesia dan Thailand diletakkan sebagai negara yang mengamalkan media sebahagian bebas.

Ketika mengulas kedudukan Malaysia yang menghampakan ini, Ahli Parlimen Balik Pulau, Yusmadi Yusoff berkata selain kajian mengenai kebebasan media di negara ini ia juga menjadi kayu pengukur kepada pentadbiran sistem demokrasi.

"Kedudukan yang lemah ini membuktikan kegagalan kerajaan Umno-BN mengamalkan sistem demokrasi sihat walaupun berkokok kepada dunia luar bahawa negara ini bebas, telus dan adil.

"Kalau dibandingkan era pentadbiran Pak Lah dan Najib, pentadbiran najib diloihat lebih mencengkam kebebasan media dam amalan demokrasi negara. Setiap pengamal terpaksa menurut telunjuk kerajaan dan agensi kerajaan juga terikat dengan arahan yang bersifat 'draconian'," kata Yusmadi.

Yusmadi berkata kerajaan perlu sedar dan mengambil langkah yang sesuai bagi memperbaiki imej serta persepsi buruk masyarakat antarabangsa terhadap kebebasan media di negara ini.

Manakala sepuluh negara yang mengamalkan media paling bebas ialah Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Belgium, Luxembourg, Andorra, Switzerland dan Liechtenstein.

Sempena Hari kebebasan Media Antarabangsa yang disambut setiap 3 Mei, Freedom House yang merupakan pejuang kebebasan demokrasi antarbangsa telah mengeluarkan senarai kedudukan negara bagi mengenalpasti negara yang mengamalkan kebebasan bermedia. -SK


Road to degrees and Ph D through Dreams and Nightmares

Posted: 03 May 2010 06:19 AM PDT

Road to degrees and Ph D through Dreams and Nightmares

Actually, I just mixed up the two seperate news_

  1. Get a PhD in dreaming at new Saudi academy
  2. Dream box office sales for 'Nightmare'  

Get a PhD in dreaming at new Saudi academy

AFP – Dreaming of an advanced degree? Try a doctorate in dreams, something which could soon become a reality in a new Saudi academy offering undergraduate and graduate degrees.

Yusuf al-Harthy, a well-known Saudi dream interpreter, plans to start up an institute offering bachelors and masters degrees as well as even a PhD in explaining dreams and visions, Al-Hayat newspaper reported on Sunday.

"Dream interpretation is by nature a way of counseling a person," said Harthy, who already runs an instructional website on deciphering the meaning of dreams.

His academy will be linked to an unnamed Arab university, he said.

Islam has a long history of dream interpretation, with the seventh century-born scholar Muhammad Ibn Sirin, a native of Basra in present-day Iraq, credited with authoring a classic Islamic catalogue on dream interpretation.

Harthy, who discusses dreams on radio and television shows, disagrees with the Saudi Islamic Affair's Ministry view that dream interpretation is not a teachable science but something born of inspiration, Al-Hayat reported.

Dream box office sales for 'Nightmare'

LOS ANGELES, May 3 — "A Nightmare on Elm Street" the latest slasher film from a newly-resurrected hit movie franchise, topped the weekend North American box office with US$32 million (RM102 million) in receipts, industry estimates showed yesterday.

Last weekend's top earner, animated Dreamworks fantasy hit "How to Train Your Dragon," fell to second place with US$10.8 million in ticket sales, box office tracker Exhibitor Relations said.

In third place was slapstick comedy "Date Night," starring Tina Fey and Steve Carell about the misadventures of a jaded married couple in search of a rare romantic evening without their kids, which earned US$7.6 million.

Fourth place went to "The Back-Up Plan," a romantic comedy starring Jennifer Lopez, which took US$7.2 million in receipts.

Kiddie flick "Furry Vengeance" about a group of woodland critters who join together to prevent the construction of a housing development on an animal reserve, debuted in fifth place, earning US$6.5 million.

In sixth place was "The Losers," an action film adaptation of the comic book of the same name, with US$6 million in its opening weekend.

"Clash of the Titans," a critically-panned blockbuster based on the exploits of Perseus and his battles with the serpent-haired Medusa and a fearsome sea monster, fell one spot to number seven, earning US$5.98 million.

Falling three places to the eighth spot was "Kick-Ass," the controversial action hero movie featuring Nicolas Cage and a host of foul-mouthed, pint-sized crime fighters, which took in US$4.45 million.

Ninth place went to the remake "Death at a Funeral," featuring stand-up stars Chris Rock, Martin Lawrence and Tracy Morgan, fell three spots to number seven, with US$4 million.

Rounding out the top ten was the nature documentary "Oceans," which took in US$2.6 million. — AFP/Relaxnews

 



Stephen Tong's Evangelistic Rally In Sibu (唐崇栄萬人佈道會) - Part 16

Posted: 03 May 2010 06:01 AM PDT

Pray to God to prepare for us the target groups, equip Sibu Christians with divine power to break through all barriers and evil designs that block people to come to know God. Pray that the hearts of Sibuians may be softened, that they be moved to come to the rally, and that they be touched to repent.

The photo shows the scene of 1 Malaysia Night at Sibu Town Square. Pray hard that the town square be filled up during the rally.

Faithful God, teach us to trust you in every circumstance. even in the midst of doubt,, help us to place ourselves in your care and under your watchful eyes. Amen

Photo: Steve Ling


SPRM perlu siasat salah guna kuasa kementerian Rais Yatim (nama dulu kementerian penerangan)

Posted: 03 May 2010 05:47 AM PDT

Cerita di bawah ini adalah dongengan semata-mata. Ia kononya berlaku di negeri yang jauh dari Malaysia lebih kurang 300 tahun yang lampau:

Sheh kata dapat RM4 juta. Dapat cash. Dapat bangunan.
Duit juta2 pun orang PAS bg cash. Takdak rekod bank untuk di trace. Untraceable! Cerdik!

Tak seperti orang PKR. Rasuah seks yg meninggalkan DNA pun buat. Sudah buat mengaku pulak "terima sedekah"!

Sudah mengaku, terus melompat. Lompat punya lompat, semua bukti jatuh bertaburan. Pendakwaraya cari, tak jumpa dah bukti. Lepas. Bebas. Tinggi sungguh integriti mereka.
He he he.

Sekarang ni heboh. Buruk perangai PAS ni. Perabih 3 juta nak perburuk Pak Lah. Nak pejatuh umno. He he he.

Sheh pun mengaku dalam blog dia. Dia tak fitnah. Dia melaporkan kebenaran. Menyebarkan maklumat utk jatuhkan kuasa Pak Lah. 2 - 3 kali dipanggil SPRM.

Kenapa Sheh dipanggil SPRM?
Dia terima rasuah ka? Rasanya tidak. Dia terima bayaran untuk perkhidmatan. Khidmat dia mengumpul maklumat kepincangan pentadbiran BN dan menyebarkannya melaui fliers, internet, poster, dan brochure.
Jadi SPRM nak siasat Pak Lah dgn Kairi kot.

Kalau SPRM siasat Sheh sbb terima RM4 juta. Pasal apa tak siasat APCO terima RM76juta?

Logiknya SPRM siasat Pak Lah la tu. Habih la Tun Lah kena baling keluaq tingkap la lepas ni ha ha ha. SPRM cengil ooo!

Satu bab lagi. Heran!
Awat dok heboh PAS perabih duit main perang saraf? Salah tang mana? Hari hari RTM Media Prima dok pasang propaganda mengata huduh kat Pembangkang tu tak kira propaganda ka? Tak perang saraf ka? Berapa juta habih duit?

Berani ka rtm tv3 tak bubuh propaganda perburuk pembangkang. Aci kerat kuku, mampuih depa tak berani!

Kalau tak bubuh, rosemah nanti pecat la hangpa semua ha ha ha.

Berapa juta bajet kerajaan untuk rtm setahun? Utk kementerian penerangan? Ada 3 juta?
Aku yakin lebih. Lebiiiiiih 3-4 kali ganda. Tu macam mana kira bajet tu. Duit mai dari poket rakyat. Rakyat ni campuq sama banyak pembangkang dgn bukan. Jadinya salah guna duit rakyat la juga. Awat SPRM tak pi siasat kemeterian penerangan menyalahguna duit rakyat dengan menyiarkan propaganda memburuk-buruk pembangkang. Kelantan dalam Gerhana cthnya.
Sepatutnya duit bajet kementerian diguna utk bg rakyat cerdik. Letak rancagan berkualiti. Macam rancangan National Geography tu. Bukan dok buat Kelantan dalam Gerhana. Ini salah guna kuasa dan salah guna dana. Sila siasat wahai SPRM.

Tu belum masuk bab bagi airtime kat Rosemah dalam berita tv tiap2 minggu. Berapa Najib bayaq? Kalau dia tak bayaq, salah guna duit rakyat lagi. Siasat SPRM! siasat! Apa kerja bini dia nak masuk berita? Berlakon iklan ka? Tiap kali masuk dok promote diri sendiri. Apa faedah rakyat dapat dengan dok tengok muka Rosemah? Memenuhi fungsi kementerian penerangan ka?
Kalau tak kena dengan kriteria kementerian, kenapa muka Rosemah diluluskan masuk brita?

Dulu aku ada sembang dengan Syed Munauwar. Dia kata boss dia di RTM panggil semua staf. Bagi amanat. Amanat dia simple saja. Kita mesti buat propaganda BN hari-hari kata boss dia. Orang tak suka tengok rtm pun takpa, janji tugas kita terlaksana!
Dapat gaji dari JPA, tapi seluruh kemeterian berkhidmat utk BN! Lagu mana ni SPRM? Tak berasa nak siasat ka?

PAS perabih RM3 juta tak pakai duit kerajaan, hangpa nak siasat! Takda maknanya... Takde makne nyeeee!


Sent via BlackBerry from Maxis


Sampai Bila Polis Hendak Menipu Rakyat?

Posted: 03 May 2010 05:30 AM PDT

Polis acapkali akan menggunakan alasan "menyelamatkan diri" di dalam kes-kes tembak mati mereka yang dikatakan sebagai "penjenayah" sekalipun tembakan kepada orang awam yang tidak berdosa.

Inilah yang berlaku terhadap kes Aminul-Rasyid Amzah dan kes Norizan Salleh.

Polis bersiap sedia mereka-reka cerita yang bukan-bukan bagi menjustifikasikan tembakan mereka dan ia akan disahkan pula oleh mereka yang berpangkat tinggi yang kemudiannya akan membuat kenyataan media bagi membohongi rakyat.

Mengimbau kembali kes Suwandi dan Azman yang ditembak di Kuala Terengganu, anehnya Suwandi dan Azman yang diheret ke mahkamah sedangkan polis yang menembak lepas bebas.

Dalam banyak kes yang jika dibawa ke mahkamah pula, dengan sistem kehakiman Malaysia yang korup seperti yang dibuktikan di dalam kes corect, correct, correct, polis akan menang dan rakyat yang menjadi mangsa mati katak tanpa terbela.

Kemudiannya, akan segera pula disahkan oleh menteri-menteri termasuk menteri menyatakan kes itu masih dalam siasatan.

Persoalannya sampai bila polis hendak dibiarkan bersikap demikian? Apakan perlu ada anak menteri yang nanti mati ditembak baru negara terkejut dan akan membuat perubahan untuk memberhentikan penipuan dan pembohongan polis itu?

Baca kisah pembohongan polis yang diceritakan sendiri oleh saksi utama kejadian kes kematian Aminuul-Rasyid kerana ditembak dengan kejam oleh anggota polis.


Saksi nafi Aminulrasyid cuba rempuh polis

Penumpang yang juga rakan remaja 14 tahun yang ditembak mati oleh polis - Aminulrasyid Amzah menolak dakwaan polis bahawa mangsa cuba merempuh ke arah polis.

"Apabila ditembak, badannya terkulai di peha saya tetapi kakinya (Aminulrasyid) masih di accelerator yang menyebabkan kereta bergerak dan polis terus menembak," katanya pada sidang media di rumah keluraga Aminulrasyid, hari ini.

Menceritakan kejadian Isnin lalu, Azamuddin Omar, 15 berkata, kereta berkenaan kemudian berlanggar dengan sebuah tembok dan polis terus menembak.

Azamuddin yang cedera pada bahagian lengan dan belakangnya juga mendakwa lima anggota polis kemudiannya membelasahnya selepas dia keluar dari kereta untuk menyerah diri.

Pelajar tingkatan tiga itu masih ketakutan kini menjalani rawatan untuk trauma.

Bapa saudara kepada mangsa, Kamaruddin Hassan yang berada pada sidang media itu berkata pihaknya tidak mahu inkues berhubung pembunuhan itu seperti yang dicadangkan oleh Ketua Polis Negara, Tan Sri Musa Hassan.

"Kami mahu siasatan diraja kerana hanya itu sahaja cara bagi mendapatkan siasatan yang telus dan adil," katanya.

Menurut peguam keluarga berkenaan, N Surendren, tidak perlu diadakan inkues kerana tidak ada pertikaian mengenai cara remaja itu meninggal dunia.

Kamaruddin juga membidas Ketua Polis Negara, Tan Sri Musa Hassan yang dilaporkan berkata pihaknya sedia mengundurkan polis jika orang ramai tidak lagi mahu mereka menguat-kuasakan undang-undang.

"Kami hormati polis tetapi mungkin ada yang diibaratkan sengai 'buah busuk' di kalangan mereka," katanya.

Keluarga berkenaan juga merayu kepada semua pihak bagi menghentikan spekulasi dan membuat kenyataan yang boleh melukakan perasaan ibu Aminulrasyid.

Antara kenyataan itu, termasuk dakwaan bahawa dua remaja berkenaan adalah penjenayah dan keluarga mereka patut dipersalahkan kerana membiarkan budak-budak berkenaan memandu tanpa lesen pada waktu tengah malam.

"Ada juga ura-ura bahawa kakak mangsa akan juga didakwa kerana keretanya digunakan," katanya lagi.



Banana Leaf Rice At Restoran Kanna Curry House

Posted: 03 May 2010 03:38 AM PDT

On weekends, Wuan and I would invariably ask each other the same questions: "What to eat?" and "Where to eat?" We often eat out at shopping malls because we spend quite a fair amount of time there for their accessibility and air-conditioned environment. We have eaten at most of the restaurants in those places and have gotten bored with the same food. We wanted to look for new flavours to titillate our taste buds. In the end, we would invariably end up eating at those few shopping malls because we either could not decide on what to eat or were not sure if the restaurants that we wanted to go to elsewhere were accessible.

Banana leaf rice at Restoran Kanna Curry House
Banana leaf rice at Restoran Kanna Curry House, Section 17 PJ.

The same happened last Saturday. As we threw the questions back and forth, I suggested banana leaf rice at Restoran Kanna Curry House. The last time we had banana leaf rice was in December last year in Penang. I checked the GPS map for the restaurant's location. It is just off the Rothman Roundabout. We have never been to the restaurant before although we pass by the roundabout every now and then on our way back from 1 Utama or Ikano Power Centre.

We were not familiar with Section 17 of Petaling Jaya. We got lost even with guidance from the GPS. When we finally found our bearings and found the restaurant, we developed an instant liking for the place. The restaurant was situated on one of two blocks of shophouses on high ground overlooking a road below. The lush clumps of bamboo and mature trees on the slope invoked a sense of serenity. Traffic was light. Parking spaces were ample. There was a police station a few doors from the restaurant at the next block.

Friendly waiter at Restoran Kanna Curry House
Friendly waiter at Restoran Kanna Curry House, Section 17 PJ.

There was a ramp up to the five foot way, a little steep, but Wuan had no problems getting me up and into the restaurant that was abuzz with activity. The waiters busied themselves with taking orders and serving food. We found a table at the back. The weather was humid. The ceiling fans and mist fans made it bearable. Service was prompt and friendly. We ordered two banana leaf rice. The side dishes that we wanted, namely chicken varuval and deep-fried bitter gourd were sold out. Wuan settled for chicken rendang instead.

The atmosphere was lively with a steady stream of customers coming and going. We tucked heartily into our food made more delicious by several types of curry gravy that we kept adding to our rice for that extra spicy flavour. In fact I ate a little too much. Some of the waiters were having their lunch and one of them asked me if I wanted extra rice. I told him I have had enough but he insisted that I should accept the ladleful of rice that he was offering.

Deep-fried bananas, curry puffs, and vadais at Restoran Kanna Curry House
Deep-fried bananas, curry puffs, and vadais at Restoran Kanna Curry House.

Apart from the food, this restaurant gets extra points for the ramp and friendly service. Banana leaf rice is RM5 per person for as much as one could eat. The price for the side orders and drinks were stated on the signboard. The next time we eat at Kanna Curry House, we want to try the deep fried chicken and fishes as well, and not forgetting the vadais, curry puffs and deep-fried bananas. They looked tempting but we were already too full from just eating the banana leaf rice alone.

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Jenayah Bertambah Teruk Jika Musa Terus Jadi KPN

Posted: 03 May 2010 03:10 AM PDT

Naib Pengerusi DAP, Senator Tunku Abdul Aziz Ibrahim mendesak Ketua Polis Negara, Tan Sri Musa Hassan meletak jawatan dengan segera berikutan kelemahan serta kegagalan beliau menjalankan tanggungjawab menjaga keselamatan negara terutama sekali apabila peningkatan kadar jenayah semakin berleluasa.

Tunku Abdul Aziz berkata desakan itu juga dibuat berhubung kenyataan Musa yang mengugut untuk menarik balik anggota polis daripada berkawal di jalan raya selepas insiden remaja berusia 14 tahun, Aminulrasyid Amzah yang mati ditembak polis di Shah Alam pada 26 April lalu.

Katanya, reaksi Musa itu sekaligus melambangkan sikapnya yang tidak boleh menerima kritikan orang lain apabila sesuatu isu berhubung keselamatan awam mahupun kelemahan institusi Polis DiRaja Malaysia dibangkitkan.

"Dia ni memang tak boleh terima kritikan langsung. Kalau kita buat apa-apa kritik, dia terus mengugut untuk menarik balik anggotanya daripada menjalankan tugas. Ini jelas menunjukkan bahawa dia seorang yang tak boleh menerima kritikan orang lain sedangkan tugas utama beliau adalah menjaga keselamatan negara. Dia ingat institusi polis dia yang punya," katanya dalam sidang media di lobi Parlimen hari ini selepas sidang Dewan Negara.

Dalam pada itu, Tunku Abdul Aziz turut mengkritik peranan PDRM yang sebelum ini memaklumkan bahawa kadar jenayah di Malaysia berjaya diturunkan sedangkan hakikat sebenar berlaku sebaliknya.

"Apa yang dia cakapkan bahawa kadar jenayah telahpun menurun adalah tidak betul. Jika kita tengok masa sekarang di tempat dan kawasan yang kita tinggal baik di bandar mahupun di kampung jenayah semakin bertambah.

"Saya baru balik dari Tawau dan Tawau paling banyak berlaku jenayah di Malaysia dan sekarang banyak bandar dan kampung di Semenanjung dah jadi macam Tawau juga," katanya lagi.

Sehubungan itu, beliau menggesa Ketua Polis Negara meletakkan jawatan dan posisinya digantikan oleh orang lain yang lebih layak.

"Dah nak bersara lagi enam bulan bagi jadi KPN, lepas itu apa dia (kementerian) buat sambung balik lagi setahun dua tahun, tak guna. Kita mahukan orang lain yang lebih bagus daripadanya. Kalau dia mudapun sekalipun kita tak peduli, sekurang-kurangnya bagi dia peluang dalam jangka lima tahun untuk merubah dan memperbaiki sistem polis yang sememangnya dah teruk.

"Kalau kita masih lagi mempertahankan KPN yang bersikap sebegini, saya ingat negara kita akan jadi lebih teruk daripada sekarang," katanya lagi.

Terdahulu bercakap dalam sidang media yang sama, Senator S Ramakrishnan menggesa PDRM mengemukakan satu sistem prosedur yang berkesan bagi menangani kes tembakan oleh anggota polis.

"Walaupun KPN telah bersetuju untuk menubuhkan satu inkues tetapi perkara ini mestilah dibincangkan juga memandangkan pada tahun 2008 juga 2009 ada kes yang langsung tidak disiasat.

"Berapa banyak kes orang awam mati ditembak polis sebelum ini dan sehingga sekarang kejadian seperti ini masih berterusan sehingga melibatkan remaja berusia 14 tahun.

"Ini bukan kejadian pertama kali berlaku. Sudah banyak kali dan sehingga sekarang tiada apa-apa siasatan. Ini menunjukkan polis tidak cekap. Sepatutnya sebaik sahaja selepas tembakan berlaku, siasatan segera hendaklah dijalankan," katanya.

Ramakrishnan bakal membentangkan usul tergempar berhubung kes kematian Aminulrasyid di Dewan Negara esok.

Menurutnya, tujuan usul berkenaan adalah bagi menyegerakan kes tersebut supaya disiasat secara profesional dan telus serta mendapat pembelaan yang sewajarnya. -SK


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